Your position:home page » currency rates » text

alex jones youtube

Release time:2018-12-17
Advertisers flee InfoWars founder Alex Jones' YouTube channel

Advertisers flee InfoWars founder Alex Jones' YouTube channel


PacificAdvertisers flee InfoWars founder Alex Jones' YouTube channelby Paul P. Murphy and Gianluca Mezzofiore   @CNNTechMarch 3, 2018: 5:44 PM ET Facebook, YouTube fail to blunt conspiracy theoriesSome of the biggest brands in the U.S. had ads running on the YouTube channels for far-right website InfoWars and its founder, notorious conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, and they say they had no idea YouTube was allowing their advertising to appear there. Last week, YouTube reprimanded the conspiracy theory site and Jones for violating its community guidelines after a video posted to The Alex Jones Channel, InfoWars' biggest YouTube account, claimed student anti-gun activists were actors. Now YouTube and Jones' channel on it are in the spotlight again. CNN has discovered ads on InfoWars' channels from companies and organizations such as Nike (NKE), Acer, 20th Century Fox, Paramount Network, the Mormon Church, Moen, Expedia (EXPE), Alibaba (BABA), HomeAway, Mozilla, the NRA, Honey, Wix and ClassPass. Even an ad for USA for UNHCR, a group that supports the UN refugee agency UNHCR, asking for donations for Rohingya refugees was shown on an InfoWars YouTube channel. Many of the brands -- including Nike, Moen, Expedia, Acer, ClassPass, Honey, Alibaba and OneFamily -- have suspended ads on InfoWars' channels after being contacted by CNN for comment. The companies, with the exception of Alibaba, which declined to comment, said they had been unaware their ads were running on The Alex Jones Channel. CNN discovered the HomeAway advertising shortly before publishing this story, and has not yet received a response from that company. InfoWars and Jones are known for peddling conspiracy theories, including the false idea that the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, in 2012 was a hoax. Related: InfoWars' main YouTube channel is two strikes away from being banned The brands purchased ad campaigns from YouTube, which is owned by Google, or through marketing companies that broadly targeted demographics and user behavior. Companies that purchase ads this way don't necessarily know where their commercials will eventually show up, but they can use exclusion filters to avoid having them appear on certain channels and kinds of content. Several brands expressed concern about the ads' placement to CNN and said they have reached out to YouTube about the situation. A Nike spokesperson said the company was "disturbed to learn that we appeared on [The Alex Jones Channel]." It has since asked YouTube to address why the channel wasn't flagged by a filter it had enabled. Nike, like some of the other brands, opted in to a "sensitive subject exclusion" filter to better control where its ads appear. The exclusion filters include, according to YouTube: "Tragedy and Conflict;" "Sensitive Social Issues;" "Sexually Suggestive Content;" "Sensational & Shocking;" and "Profanity & Rough Language." YouTube did not respond to questions from CNN about whether the channels should have been excluded by any of those filters. "We have a filter and brand safety assurances from Google our content would never run around offensive content," a Paramount Network spokesperson said, adding that the company is trying to find out what "went wrong." An Acer spokesperson confirmed the company also had reached out to its partners at YouTube, saying its "existing filters should have prevented this." The spokesperson said the company has set up additional filters to further block its ads from appearing on "divisive channels in the future." "We take great measures to ensure our ads do not run on videos with sensitive content," a spokesperson for Grammarly, an online grammar-checker tool, told CNN on Friday. It was aware their ads had run on an InfoWars channel, the spokesperson said, and had been working closely with YouTube to ensure it didn't happen again. A half hour after it sent CNN that statement, Grammarly ads were still running on an InfoWars YouTube channel. Its ads were also running on a YouTube channel that did not appear to be explicitly affiliated with InfoWars, but reposted InfoWars videos. A Grammarly spokesperson said on Saturday the company had not been aware of the ads. "We have stringent sensitive subject exclusion filters in place with YouTube that we believed would exclude such channels. We've asked YouTube to ensure this does not happen again." CNN has asked YouTube for further comment, but has not yet heard back. Honey, a company that finds discounts for shoppers online, told CNN it unknowingly spent $169.64 to promote its brand on the Alex Jones YouTube channel. Honey said its first video ad appeared on the channel on January 21 and that eventually its ads on the channel received about 300 plays per day. "[It] clearly was outside of our expectations [that this would happen by] using their sensitive subject exclusions tool," Honey co-founder Ryan Hudson told CNN. The company's ad continued to play on The Alex Jones Channel until Wednesday, when CNN asked if it had any comment on why the ad was running there. A spokesperson for 20th Century Fox said the company was unaware its ad had been placed on an InfoWars YouTube channel and after learning it had, immediately took it down. The company believes that it existing filters should have prevented it showing on the InfoWars channel. The company is now having further conversations with YouTube, the spokesperson said, "to make sure this never happens again," and has asked for a refund. A spokesperson for Mozilla told CNN, "We have explicit exclusions set up for our YouTube campaigns and should absolutely not have appeared alongside this content. We are disappointed to learn that YouTube's filters are not as effective as promised in preventing advertisements running alongside objectionable content. We've since reached out to Google and paused our advertising on the channel." A spokesperson for USA for UNHCR said that this was the group's first time running ads on YouTube, and that it would now pull its ads from all of YouTube, and has asked for money spent on InfoWars-related channels back. And a spokesperson for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints told CNN it has paused the specific ad campaign that ran on an InfoWars YouTube channel, and are looking into whether other ad campaigns are similarly affected. Related: USA Today publishes op-ed by InfoWars conspiracy theorist Companies can prevent their ads from appearing on any channel, at any time, by adding those channels to their account's "blacklist." Some of the companies CNN spoke with said that when they purchased ads on YouTube, they specifically included some of InfoWars' YouTube channels on their "blacklist," but that they were unaware InfoWars had other YouTube channels. These moves come nearly a year after YouTube suffered an advertiser backlash when brands learned their promotional posts were appearing alongside extremist content. Late last year, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki said the service would take steps to ensure advertisers "that their ads are running alongside content that reflects their brand's values." YouTube declined to comment on InfoWars and content similar to it not being flagged by the "sensitive subject exclusion" filter but emphasized its commitment to being "an open platform." "We uphold free expression according to our Community Guidelines, even when there are views we don't agree with," a YouTube spokesperson said. "When videos are flagged to us that violate our guidelines, we immediately remove them. We do not allow ads to run on videos that deal with sensitive and tragic events." Honey is currently "investigating options with Google" to recover the money it spent. It's unclear if Jones has specifically profited from the ads. YouTube allows channels with over 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 annual watch hours to be monetized. At least seven out of the 11 InfoWars-related YouTube channels fall into this category, including the Alex Jones channel. A source with access to YouTube's Creator Studio management system said the videos on the Alex Jones channel are claimed by Jones' media organization Free Speech Systems, LLC. Depending on which policy an advertiser selects, a share of the money it pays YouTube could go to Jones' company. Infowars did not respond to a CNN request for comment. In the meantime, UK-based financial company OneFamily said it "alerted Google to recommend they add [The Alex Jones Channel] to their own blacklist." --CNN's Donie O'Sullivan, Soukaina Alaoui El Hassani and Seth Fiegerman contributed to this report. Update: This article originally said one of the ads running on the Alex Jones Channel was for UNHCR. In fact, it was for USA for UNHCR, a non-profit group that supports UNHCR. CNNMoney (New York) First published March 3, 2018: 12:24 PM ET


Alex Jones on Climategate: Hoax of all time a global Ponzi scheme

Published on Nov 24, 2009Police in the UK have begun an investigation into the theft and publication on Russian internet servers of private emails, which are thought to prove that global warming theory was fabricated. Alex Jones, the renowned filmmaker and radio host, dubs this scandal as one of the biggest hoaxes and financial frauds in the history of mankind. He says that it appears to be a global 'Ponzi scheme' which allowed bankers to profit from bogus carbon taxes for years. Category


Alex Jones

Alex Jones


Alex JonesJones in 2017Born (1974-02-11) February 11, 1974 (age 44) Dallas, Texas, U.S.ResidenceAustin, Texas, U.S.OccupationRadio host, film producerKnown forVarious conspiracy theoriesNotable workInfowarsThe Alex Jones ShowSpouse(s)Kelly Jones (m. 2007; div. 2015)Children3SignatureAlexander Emric (or Emerick) Jones (born February 11, 1974)[1][2][3]is an American radio show host and conspiracy theorist.[4][5][6][7][8][9]He hosts The Alex Jones Show from Austin, Texas, which airs on the Genesis Communications Network[10]across the United States and online.[11]Jones runs a website, Infowars.com, devoted to conspiracy theories and fake news,[12][13][14]and the websitesNewsWars and PrisonPlanet. Jones has been the center of many controversies, including his promotion of Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting conspiracy theories,[15]and his aggressive opposition to gun controlin a debate with Piers Morgan.[16][17]He has accused the U.S. government of planning the Oklahoma City bombing, the September 11 attacks, and has claimed that the moon landing footage was fake.[18][19][20][21][22]He has claimed that several governments and big businesses have colluded to create a "New World Order" through "manufactured economic crises, sophisticated surveillance tech and—above all—inside-job terror attacks that fuel exploitable hysteria".[23] Jones has described himself as a conservative, paleoconservativeand libertarian, terms he uses interchangeably.[24][25]Others describe him as conservative, right-wing, alt-right,[26]and far-right.[27][28]New Yorkdescribed Jones as "America's leading conspiracy theorist",[29]and the Southern Poverty Law Centerdescribes him as "the most prolific conspiracy theorist in contemporary America".[30]Asked about such labels, Jones said he is "proud to be listed as a thought criminalagainst Big Brother".[29] Contents1 Early life2 Career2.1 Sexual harassment and antisemitism claims3 Radio, websites and mail-order business3.1 Infowars and other sites3.2 Consumer products4 Views4.1 Gun rights4.2 Vaccines4.3 Weather weapons4.4 White genocide5 Controversies5.1 School shootings5.2 Television interviews (2013)5.3 Relationship with Donald Trump5.4 Litigation5.5 Khan Shaykhun chemical attack5.6 Social media restrictions6 Personal life7 Media7.1 Films7.2 Television7.3 Author7.4 Film subject8 References9 External linksEarly lifeJones was born in 1974 in Dallas, Texas, and grew up in the Dallas suburb of Rockwalland the city of Austin, Texas. His father is a dentist[31]and his mother a homemaker.[18]In his video podcasts, he reports he is of Irish,[32]German, Welsh, mostly English, and partially Native American descent. He was a lineman on his high school's football team and graduated from Anderson High Schoolin Austin in 1993.[18]As a teenager, he read conservative journalistand conspiracy theorist Gary Allen's anti-Semiticbook None Dare Call It Conspiracy,[33]which had a profound influence on him and which he calls "the easiest-to-read primer on The New World Order".[34]After high school, Jones briefly attended Austin Community Collegebut dropped out.[35] CareerJones began his career in Austin with a live, call-in format public-accesscable televisionprogram.[36]In 1996, Jones switched format to radio, hosting a show named The Final Edition on KJFK(98.9 FM).[37]Ron Paulwas running for Congress and was a guest on his show several times.[38]When the Oklahoma City bombinghappened in 1995 Jones began accusing the government of being responsible, saying, "I understood there's a kleptocracy working with psychopathic governments—clutches of evil that know the tricks of control".[39]In 1998, he released his first film, America Destroyed By Design. In 1998, Jones organized a successful effort to build a new Branch Davidianchurch, as a memorial to those who died during the 1993 fire that ended the government's siegeof the original Branch Davidian complex near Waco, Texas.[40]He often featured the project on his public-access television program and claimed that David Koreshand his followers were peaceful people who were murdered by Attorney General Janet Renoand the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearmsduring the siege.[37]In the same year, he was removed from a George W. Bushrally at Bayport Industrial District, Texas. Jones interrupted governorBush's speech, demanding that the Federal Reserveand Council on Foreign Relationsbe abolished. Journalist David Weigel, reporting on the incident, said Jones "seemed to launch into public events as if flung from another universe."[41] In 1999, Jones tied with Shannon Burkefor that year's "Best Austin Talk Radio Host" poll, as voted by The Austin Chroniclereaders.[42]Later that year, he was fired from KJFK-FM for refusing to broaden his topics. His views were making the show hard to sell to advertisers, according to the station's operations manager.[37]Jones stated: It was purely political, and it came down from on high ... I was told 11 weeks ago to lay off [Bill] Clinton, to lay off all these politicians, to not talk about rebuilding the church, to stop bashing the Marines, A to Z.[37] He began broadcasting his show by Internet connection from his home.[39]In early 2000, Jones was one of seven Republicancandidates for state representativein Texas House District 48, an open swing district based in Austin, Texas. Jones stated that he was running "to be a watchdog on the inside"[43]but withdrew from the race after a couple of weeks. In July, a group of Austin Community Access Center (ACAC) programmers claimed that Jones used legal proceedings and ACAC policy to intimidate them or get their shows thrown off the air.[44]On July 15, 2000, Jones infiltrated the Cremation of Care,[45]which he called "a ritualistic shedding of conscience and empathy" and an "abuse of power".[46] In 2001, his show was syndicated on approximately 100 stations.[39]After the 9/11 attack, Jones began to speak of a conspiracy by the Bush administration as being behind the attack,[8]which caused a number of the stations that had previously carried him to drop his program, according to Will Bunch.[47] Jones at a protest in Dallas in 2014On June 8, 2006, while on his way to cover a meeting of the Bilderberg Groupin Ottawa, Jones was stopped and detained at the Ottawa airportby Canadian authorities who confiscated his passport, camera equipment, and most of his belongings. He was later allowed to enter Canada lawfully. Jones said about the reason for his immigration hold, "I want to say, on the record, it takes two to tango. I could have handled it better."[48] On September 8, 2007, he was arrested while protesting at 6th Avenue and 48th Street in New York City. He was charged with operating a megaphonewithout a permit. Two others were also cited for disorderly conduct when his group crashed a live television show featuring Geraldo Rivera. In an article, one of Jones' fellow protesters said, "It was ... guerrilla information warfare."[49] On June 6, 2013, Jones addressed international media for the annual Bilderberg conferencein Watford, England.[50][51]He gave an hour-long speech[52]to around 2,000 protesters in the grounds of The Grovehotel,[53]where he was "rapturously welcomed", "surrounded by cameras and peppered with questions".[54] On July 21, 2016, following the 2016 Republican National Convention, Jones and Roger Stonebegan plotting the removal of Ted Cruzfrom his Senate seat after he failed to endorse Donald Trump as the Republican presidential candidate, with potential challengers Katrina Piersonand Dan Patrickmooted as replacements in the upcoming Texas election for Senatein 2018.[55] On July 6, 2017, alongside Paul Joseph Watson, Jones began hosting a contest to create the best "CNN Meme", in which the winner would receive $20,000. The contest was created in response to CNNreleasing an article regarding a Reddit userwho had created a pro-Trump, anti-CNN meme.[56][57] On January 23, 2018, it was announced that Jones would be working with author Neil Strausson his upcoming book, titled The Secret History of the Modern World & the War for the Future.[58][59][60] Sexual harassment and antisemitism claimsIn February 2018, Jones was accused by two former employees of antisemitism, anti-black racism and sexual harassment of males and females. Jones denied the allegations.[61][62][63] Radio, websites and mail-order businessThe Alex Jones Show is broadcast nationally by the Genesis Communications Networkto more than 90 AM and FM radio stations in the United States,[64]including WWCR, a shortwave radiostation.[65]The Sunday show also airs on KLBJ. In 2010, the show attracted around 2 million listeners each week.[66] According to journalist Will Bunch, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America,[67][68]the show has a demographic heavier in younger viewers than other conservative pundits due to Jones's "highly conspiratorial tone and Web-oriented approach". Bunch has also stated that Jones "feed[s] on the deepest paranoia".[47]According to Alexander Zaitchik of Rolling Stonemagazine, in 2011 he had a larger on-line audience than Glenn Beckand Rush Limbaughcombined.[39] Infowars and other sitesInfowars.com logoMain article: InfoWarsJones is the publisher and director of the Infowars.com website.[69]The Infowars website receives approximately 10 million monthly visits, making its reach more extensive than mainstream news websites such as The Economistand Newsweek.[70][71] Newswars logoIn August 2017, Jones announced the launch of NewsWars.com, a site Jones said was intended to battle news that he considers to be fake news.[72] Jones also operates the PrisonPlanet.com website.[73] Consumer productsA 2017 piece for German magazine Der Spiegelby Veit Medick indicated that two-thirds of Jones' funds derive from sales of a successful range of his own products. These products are marketed through the Infowars website and through advertising spots on Jones' show. They include dietary supplements, toothpaste, bulletproof vests and "brain pills," which hold "an appeal for anyone who believes Armageddonis near", according to Medick.[74] In August 2017, Californian medical company Labdoor, Increported on tests applied to six of Jones' dietary supplement products. These included a product named Survival Shield, which was found by Labdoor to contain only iodine, and a product named Oxy-Powder, which comprised a compound of magnesium oxide and citric acid; common ingredients in dietary supplements. Labdoor indicated no evidence of prohibited or harmful substances, but cast doubt on Infowars' marketing claims for these products, and asserted that the quantity of the ingredients in certain products would be "too low to be appropriately effective".[75][76][77] On a segment of Last Week Tonight, host John Oliverstated that Jones spends "nearly a quarter" of his on-air time promoting products sold on his website, many of which are purported solutions to medical and economic problems claimed to be caused by the conspiracy theories described on his show.[78][79] ViewsJones during a 9/11 Truth movementevent on September 11, 2007, in ManhattanMainstream sources have described Jones as a conservative,[80]far-right,[81]alt-right,[82]and a conspiracy theorist.[83][84][85][86]Jones has described himself as a libertarian[24]and a paleoconservative.[25]He indicated his support for Donald Trumpduring the Presidential campaign in 2016also denouncing Trump's rival Hillary Clinton("Hillary for prison!")[87]and Barack Obama.[88] Gun rightsJones is a vocal gun rightsadvocate.[89][90]MTVhave labeled him a "staunch Second Amendmentsupporter",[91]while the London Daily Telegraphcalled him a "gun-nut".[92]He has been widely quoted in international media for claiming, in a debate with Piers Morgan, that "1776 will commence again if you try to take our firearms".[93][94]Jones was referencing the American Revolutionary Warin relation to theoretical gun controlmeasures taken by the government. He has been reported to own around 50 firearms.[95] VaccinesJones is well-known and widely reported in media for both his opposition to vaccines,[96]and his views on vaccine controversies.[97][98]On June 16, 2017, Voxcovered his claim that the introduction of the Sesame Streetcharacter Julia, an autisticMuppet, was "designed to normalize autism, a disorder caused by vaccines."[99]On November 20, 2017, The New Yorkerquoted Jones as claiming Infowars was "defending people's right to not be forcibly infected with vaccines".[100]ThinkProgresshave declared that he "continues to endanger children by convincing their parents that vaccines are dangerous."[101]Jones has specifically disputed the safety and effectivenessof MMR vaccines.[102] Weather weaponsMother Joneshas claimed that Jones is a believer in weather weapons,[103]and Salonhas covered his claim "that the president has access to weather weapons capable of not only creating tornadoes but also moving them around, on demand".[104]His belief in weather warfare has been reported by mainstream media.[105][106][107]He has claimed that Hurricane Irmamay have been geo-engineered.[108] White genocideJones has promoted the white genocide conspiracy theory.[109]Media Matterscovered his claim that NFLplayers protesting during the national anthemwere "kneeling to white genocide" and violence against whites,[110]which the SPLCfeatured in their headlines review.[111]On October 2, 2017, Jones claimed that Democratsand communists were plotting imminent "white genocide" attacks.[112]His reporting and public views on the topic have received support and coverage from white nationalistpublications and groups, such as AltRight.comand the New Zealand National Front.[113][114] ControversiesJones has been the center of many controversies. He has accused the United States government of being involved in the Oklahoma City bombing[18]and the September 11 attacks,[17]as well as claiming that two school shootings were "false flag" operations. In 2009, Jones claimed that a convicted con man's scheme to take over a long-vacant, would-be for-profit prison in Hardin, Montanawas part of a FEMA plot to detain U.S. citizens in concentration camps.[115]Jones was in a "media crossfire" in 2011, which included criticism by Rush Limbaugh, when the news spread that Jared Lee Loughner, the perpetrator of the 2011 Tucson shooting, had been "a fan" of the 9/11 conspiracyfilm Loose Changeof which Jones had been an executive producer.[14] His website Infowars.com has been described as a fake news websiteand has been accused of spreading conspiracy theories.[12][13][116][14][117][118] School shootingsJones has been criticized for propagating conspiracy theories about the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootingin 2012 and the Stoneman Douglas High School shootingin 2018 being false flag operations engineered by gun control advocates. In particular, he has stated that "no one died" in Sandy Hook and that Stoneman Douglas survivor David Hoggwas a crisis actor.[119][120]Claims made in support of these theories have been proven false.[121][122] In March 2018, six families of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting as well as an FBI agent who responded to the attack filed a defamation lawsuit against Jones for his role in spreading conspiracy theories about the shooting.[123][124][125][126] Television interviews (2013)In January 2013, Jones was invited to speak on Piers Morgan's show after promoting an online petition to deport Morgan because of his support of gun control laws.[127]The interview turned into "a one-person shoutfest, as Jones riffed about guns, oppressive government, the flag, his ancestors' role in Texan independence, and what flag Morgan would have on his tights if they wrestled."[127]The event drew widespread coverage,[127]and according to The Huffington Post, Morgan and others such as Glenn Beck"agreed that Jones was a terrible spokesman for gun rights".[128]Jones's appearance on the show was a top trending Twitter topic the following morning.[129] On June 9, 2013, Jones appeared as a guest on the BBC's television show Sunday Politics, during a discussion about conspiracy theories surrounding the Bilderberg Groupmeetings with presenter Andrew Neiland journalist David Aaronovitch. A critic of such theories, Aaronovitch implied that, since Jones had not been killed for exposing conspiracies, they either do not exist or that Jones is a part of them himself. Jones began shouting and interrupting, and Andrew Neil ended the interview, describing Jones as "an idiot"[130]and "the worst person I've ever interviewed".[131][132]According to Neil on Twitter, Jones was still shouting until he knew that he was off-air.[130][131] Relationship with Donald TrumpIn December 2015, Jones initially "formed a bond" with Donald Trump, after the presidential candidate appeared on The Alex Jones Show, with Trump stating "Your reputation is amazing. I will not let you down."[103]During the 2016 presidential campaign, Hillary Clintoncriticized Trump for his ties to Jones.[133][134]Jones said that Trump called him on the day after the election to thank him for his help in the campaign.[135]Since Trump took office, it has been claimed Jones communicates with the President through aides, something which Chief of Staff John Kellyhad reportedly tried to block.[136][137]In June 2017, journalist and commentator Bill Moyerswrote that Trump and Jones explicitly "operate as a tag team".[138]In April 2018, Jones publicly criticized President Trump during a livestream, after Trump announced a military strikeagainst Syria. During the stream, Jones also stated that Trump had not called him during the prior six months.[139] LitigationIn February 2017, the lawyers of James Alefantis, owner of Comet Ping Pongpizzeria, sent Jones a letter demanding an apology and retraction for his role in pushing the Pizzagate conspiracy theory. Under Texas law, Jones was given a month to comply or be subject to a libel suit.[140]In March 2017, Alex Jones apologized to Alefantis for promulgating the conspiracy theory and retracted his allegations.[141] In April 2017, the Chobaniyogurt company filed a lawsuit against Jones for his article that claims that the company's factory in Idaho, which employs refugees, was connected to a 2016 child sexual assault and a rise in tuberculosis cases.[142]As a result of the lawsuit, Jones issued an apology and retraction of his allegations in May 2017.[143] In March 2018, Brennan Gilmore, who shared a video he captured of a car hitting anti-racism protesters at the 2017 Unite the Right rallyin Charlottesville, Virginia, filed a lawsuit[144]against Jones and six others. According to the lawsuit, Jones said that Gilmore was acting as part of a false flag operation conducted by disgruntled government "deep state" employees in furtherance of a coup against President Trump.[145]Gilmore alleges he has been receiving death threats from Jones' audience.[145] Khan Shaykhun chemical attackIn April 2017, Jones was criticized for claiming that the Khan Shaykhun chemical attackwas a hoax and a "false flag".[146][147]Jones stated that the attack was potentially carried out by civil defensegroup White Helmets, which he claims are an Al-Qaeda-affiliated terrorist frontfinanced by George Soros.[148][149] Social media restrictionsOn July 24, 2018,[150]YouTube removed four of InfoWars' videos citing "long-standing policies against child endangerment and hate speech",[151][152]and issued a "strike" against the Infowars channel.[150]YouTube also suspended the channel's ability to live stream.[152]On July 27, 2018, Facebooksuspended Jones's profile for 30 days, and also removed the same videos, saying they violated Facebook's standards against hate speech and bullying.[153][150]On August 3, 2018, Stitcher Radioremoved all of his podcasts stating that he was involved in harassment or encouraged it.[154] On August 6, 2018, Facebook, Apple, YouTubeand Spotifyremoved all content by Alex Jones and Infowars from their platforms for violating their policies. YouTube removed various channels associated with Infowars, including The Alex Jones Channel, which had amassed 2.4 million subscriptions prior to its removal.[155]On Facebook, four pages that were associated with InfoWars and Alex Jones were removed due to repeated violations of the website's policies. Apple removed all podcasts associated with Jones from its iTunesplatform and its podcast app.[156]On August 13, 2018, Vimeoremoved all of Jones' videos because they "violated our terms of service prohibitions on discriminatory and hateful content".[157]Facebook mentioned that dehumanizing language about immigrants, Muslims and transgenderpeople, as well as violence glorification, were among the hate speech policy violations.[158][159] Jones' accounts have also been removed from Pinterest,[160]Mailchimp[161]and LinkedIn.[162]As of early August 2018, Jones still had active accounts on Instagram,[163]Google+[164]and Twitter.[165][166]Jones tweeted a Periscopevideo calling on others "to get their battle rifles ready against antifa, the mainstream media, and Chicomoperatives".[167]In the video he also says, "Now is time to act on the enemy before they do a false flag." Twitter cited this as the reason to suspend his account for a week on August 14.[168]On September 6, 2018, Jones was permanently banned from Twitter and Periscope after confronting and berating CNNreporter Oliver Darcy.[169][170]On September 7, 2018, the Infowars app was removed from the Apple App Storefor "objectionable content".[171]He was banned from using PayPalfor his business transactions, with PayPal citing "instances that promoted hate or discriminatory intolerance against certain communities and religions, which run counter to our core value of inclusion," in their announcement.[172] Personal lifeJones has three children with ex-wife Kelly Jones. The couple divorced in March 2015.[173]In 2017, Kelly sought sole or joint custody of their children due to her ex-husband's behavior. She claimed "he's not a stable person" and "I'm concerned that he is engaged in felonious behavior, threatening a member of Congress" (Adam Schiff). His attorney responded by claiming that "he's playing a character" and describing him as a "performance artist".[174][175]In court, Jones denied playing a character and he called his show "the most bona fide, hard-core, real McCoything there is, and everybody knows it".[176]Kelly was awarded the right to decide where their children live while he maintains visitation rights.[177] His son, Rex Jones, has worked for Infowars, receiving media attention for a video which was critical of gun controland BuzzFeed News.[178]Jones has credited Rex for convincing him to support Donald Trumpas a presidential candidate.[179] MediaFilmsJones and filmgoers at the première of A Scanner Darklyin which Jones has a cameo[39]


Alex Jones

Alex Jones


Alexander Emerick Jones [3][4](1974–imminent FEMA takeover) is a nutritional supplementsalesman who moonlights as a batshit crazy radioshock-jock and a legally certified[5]self-proclaimed "performance artist".[6]His specialty is making up conspiracy theoriesto amuse his audience (either that or he's the world's best parodist), and is the world's most powerful conspiracy pusher, with his shows drawing millions of views daily.[7]Any time anything interesting happens anywhere on Earth, there's a 100% chance Jones has found "proof"it is either (1) a false flag operationby the New World Orderor (2) a "massive coverupoperation" run by the New World Order. No exceptions. You would think the white coats would have taken him away in a straightjacket by now New World Order would've eliminated this widely-known bearer of all their secrets, but nope. For some reason they see fit to let him continue.Like all good showmen, you must understand his early work to truly appreciate his art. Jones got his start in 1995 on Access TV in Austin, and first tasted the limelight with Y2K. And he was ready: grunting about the end of money, reporting on millions of deaths worldwide, and shillingfor his survivalistshop called "The Hardware Store", with guns, ammo, MREs,and eight-stage water filtration systems.[8][9]And we all awoke on January 1, 2000 to… absolutely nothing. Most Texansassumed he was done. Then 9/11swooped in and bailed the charlatanout. Then Obamabecame the antichrist of choice. (Literally.[10]) Then Trumpbecame Jones' best pal.[11] In short: Jones has been predicting the end of the world for 23 years. And it gets worse from there. Goathelp us all. Contents1 Influence2 Conspiracy theories2.1 New World Order2.2 List of conspiracist views held by one Mr. Jones2.3 Meta-conspiracies2.4 Why isn't Jones dead?3 Political stance4 Godfather of fake news4.1 DVDs4.2 Infowars4.3 PrisonPlanet4.4 Typical advertisements4.5 A Scanner Darkly5 Other dubious achievements6 The Alex Avalanche7 Crumbling empire8 Guests9 In a nutshell10 See also11 External links


Post a Tweet on Twitter

Tweet TextFlorida school shooting conspiracy theories have landed Alex Jones and InfoWars in hot water with YouTube http://www.newsweek.com/alex-jones-gets-strike-twitter-fights-shooting-survivor-822769


Alex

For other uses, see Alex (disambiguation).Alex is a common given namecommonly associated with the Greek name Alexandros. In English, it is usually a diminutiveof the male given name Alexander, or its female equivalent Alexandraor Alexandria.[1]Aleck or Alecis the Scottish form of Alex. The East European male name Alexey(Aleksei, Alexis, Aleksa) is also sometimes shortened to Alex. It is a commonly used nickname in Spanish for Alejandro, Alexandro, Alejandrino and Alexandrino, and related names like Alexa and Alexis. Contents1 People whose first name is Alex2 People commonly named or nicknamed Alex2.1 American footballers2.2 Association footballers

source : international currency ,Welcome to reprint and share。

Related articles

Some netizens have made a critical comment. What are you waiting for?Come on

Required

Optional

Optional

Remember, I don't need to re-enter my personal information next time