Your position:home page » currency converter » text

art nouveau font styles for women

Release time:2019-04-17
MoMA

AbstractA term generally used to describe art that is not representational or based on external reality or nature. Related:


Typography in Ukraine

Typography in Ukraine


rallyedingbat typeface Rallye Symbols(2008). Dafont link. In 2010, he went commercial as 2D Typo. The first typeface at 2D typo was the modular pixelish Pressure Drop 2D (2010). This was followed by Ornamental Deco 2D(2010, art deco ornaments), Rally Symbols 2D (2010), Mascaron2D(2010, by Iryna Korchuk), Depot Trapharet 2d (2010, a stencil based on the tram lettering in Lviv), Ascetic 2D(2005-2010), Hutsulyandiya (2010, extraordinary ornaments by Iryna Korchuk), Simeon (2010, calligraphic), Cranked Pipe 2D(2011), Tripyllia 2D (2011, ornaments of the neolithic Trypillya culture), and Ukrainian Barokko(2010, a calligraphic typeface by Genadij Zarechnjuk), Historism Border (2011, border ornaments), Moreske 2D(2012, ornaments), Geomanticus(2012, modular squarish sans). Typefaces from 2013: Bandelwerk(borders), Digital Stitch, Modern Wave(ornaments based on Alphonse Mucha), Hopferian(Roman caps after engravings by Daniel Hopfer (1470-1536)---typeface completed with help of Mariya Sokil), Simple Ribbon (art nouveau dingbats). In 2014, he created Angusto(an elegant narrow shaded display typeface family), Vindemiam(ornamental borders), Squamish(ornamental borders), UA Map(maps of Ukraine dingbats) and Bohemian Border. In 2014, Dmitry Rastvortsev, Lukyan Turetsky, and Henadij Zarechnjuk cooperated on the design of the freeLatin / Cyrillic handwriting typeface Kobzar KS, which is based on the handwriting of Taras Shnvchenko, a famous Ukrainian poet, artist and philosopher. Typefaces from 2015: Finetitle(ornaments for headers), Gothic Herbarium(a floriated ornamental font based on the Gothic Revival ornaments developed by Augustus Pugin (1812-1852)), Old Depot(rough stencil), Francesca(decorative caps). Typefaces from 2016: Geometric Harmony(geometric ornaments), Dubster(which he describes as a technocratic modular font). Typefaces from 2017: Military Symbols. Typefaces from 2018: Strapwork(four ornamental typefaces with friezes, borders and motifs modeled after Balthasar Bos (1554) and 16th century mannerism). [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ 2SF Vinnitsa, Ukraine-based group that designed the experimental techno typeface Lower Ladle(2011). [Google][More]  ⦿ 4th February[Sergiy Tkachenko] Sergiy Tkachenko(b. 1979, Khrystynivka, Cherkasy region, Ukraine) lives in Kremenchuk, Ukraine, and has been a prolific type designer since 2008. Sergiy graduated from Kremenchuk State Polytechnic University in computer systems and networks in 2007. Various other URLs: Microsoft link, Identifont, 4th February, Behance, Klingspor link, Revision Ru, Russian creators, CPLUVFontspace, Twitter. Kernest link. Sergey Tkachenko's typefaces: 2008: the techno typefaces Bladi One 4F, Bladi One Slab 4F, Bladi Two 4F, Abia Wide 4F Thin. 2009: Wrongo 4F, Zantiqa(an über-serif), Serifiqo(a (free) thin didone fashion magdisplay face), Codename Coder 4F (monospace programming font), Droporado 4F (using circles only), Tovstun(futuristic, ultra-fat and rounded), Perfocard 4F, Modularico (five modular typefaces based on a logo from Master Kremenchug a company for which Sergiy worked for 4 years), Boldesqo Serif 4F(a splendid informal fat didone, now with Greek support), Tkachenko Sketch, Unicase Slab(a techno slab), Laftatic, Logofontik 4F (techno), PC.DE Stencil (+Italic; custom stencil font), Stenciliqo 4F, Tiap Liap 4F (handwriting), Nut Kit 4F, Rezzzistor 4F, the inline modular faceGrand Hotel, and Bijou 4F. 2010: Roboo 4F(a bubblegum typeface family), PädIn(a custom typeface for Pädagogische Initiative e.V.: rounded fat informal face), FatQuad(in thefattytrend), Veselka(afree multiline face), Smeshariki Black(+ Gleams: a bubble gum font made for an animation company), Republica 4F (a fat family), Rodeqa Slab 4F, ComFi (semi-octagonal), Grotesqa 4F, Nowy Geroy 4F, Fabryka 4F(a monospaced typewriter family), Placarto4F-Italic(anultra fatart deco), Lavina 4F(a hairline sans with lachrymal terminals). 2011: Squartica (octagonal), Decomart (free), Model 4F Unicase(a unicase fat didone released in 2013 only), Fontatigo 4F, Kylie 4F(bilined and geometric), Waldemar 4F(a largedidonestylefat typeface family), Dinesqo(2011, a monoline sans of utter simplicity), Qargotesk (+Cyrillic) [images: i, ii, iii, iv], Neultica 4F(black unicase family), Squartiqa 4F (2011, constructivist), Clarenta4FBlack(afterClarendon---a great family), Designosaur(free sans), Perfopunto(basedonperforatedcirclesand squares), OlaScript4F, Bayadera 4F(a tamed upright monoline script), Febrotesk4FUnicase(squarish unicase family). 2012: Targo 4F(rounded typeface with stencil and non-stencil styles), Myra(free font), Myra 4F Caps(free), Cedra(wide monolined sans face), Fontatica 4F(rounded techno grotesk), Akzentica 4F, Ukraintica 4F Wide(a monoline wide-bowled sans family), Laventa 4F, Sports World(free athletic lettering font), Web Serveroff (free computer geek font), Octin Spraypaint Cyrillic(a rough stencil done exclusively for Ninja Theory). 2013: Condesqa(modular sans), Esqadero (an uncomplicated monoline sans), Vanyla 4FUnicase (monoline), Esqadero FF CY(a free wide sans, Cyrillic), Bond(a confident no-frills sans), Attentica(free sans font for Latin and Cyrillic), Cedra 4F Wide Thin. Cyrillizations: several typefaces such as Lavoisier (by Alec Julien), Budmo Jiggler (Ray Larabie) and JoAnne Display (Sandy Cerovich), Gnuolane (of a Ray Larabie font), Paranoid Cyrillic (based on Kevin Lo's Paranoid), Movavi Grotesque Black(+Cyrillic; image; numerals), Azoft Sans(made for Azoft, and free hereand here). Custom fonts: Blue Pill, Sansus Webissimo (since 2011 free at Open Font Library), Minaeff ECT(2011, a free legible familyfor Latin and Cyrillic, custom-made for and downloadable from WebhostingRating.com), Webhostinggeeks.Com(2011), Web Serveroff, OnlinePharmacyCheck.Com (2011), 1800Flowers.com (2011), DesignStudio.com (2011, free), ArchyStudio.Com (2011, free download, Movavi Grotesque(2011, free), Azoft Sans, PÄd In, Smeshariki, Fat Cow (2010: freecondensed sans), ComFi (2010, free), PC.de (2009: freetechno family, including a stencil face), League Gothic(2009-2011, The League of Movable Type) Cyrillic, Paranoid Cyrillic, 28 Days Later Cyrillic, Acid Label Cyrillic, Dead Secretary Cyrillic, Rezland Cyrillic, Sweet Leaf Cyrillic, Droid Cyrillic, Jo Anne Display Cyrillic, Gnuolane Free Cyrillic, Bosox Cyrillic, Budmo Jiggler Cyrillic. Typefaces from 2014: Laqonic 4F(unicase sans), Cubynets 4F, Blogger Sans (freerounded organic sans), Boncegro (freeWestern typeface, briefly called Vaquero before a name change), Motor 4F(based on Russian car license plates), Monitorica (a futuristic typeface made for ipHostMonitor.com, free at OFL), Areqo(condensed titling sans), Architect's Daughter Cyrillic (architectural lettering), GetVoIP Grotesque(a freetypeface commissioned by GetVoIP), Meeneralca(unicase sans inspired by the logo of the mineral water Borjomi from Georgia), Glasoor(freeoil spill or jelly bean font), Robotesqa. Typefaces from 2015: Croogla(a circle-based informal sans), Blackentina 4F(freeultra-black squarish typeface), Dart 4F(neo-grotesque), Kent 4F(a layered family for letterpress emulation). Typefaces from 2016: Brent 4F (original design going back to 2013), a custom typeface for the labels used in the Ukrainian Armed Forces, Economica Cyrillic Pro(with Vicente Lamonaca). Typefaces from 2018: Indi Kazka 4F(Indic simulation). Abstract Fonts link. Dafont link. Creative Market link. Behance link. Hellofont link. Open Font Library link. View Sergiy Tkachenko's fonts. [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Adolphe Mouron Cassandre His real name is Adolphe Jean-Marie Mouron, and he was born in Kharkiv, Ukraine in 1901. He committed suicide in Paris in 1968, after the rejection of one of his innovative designs by a German publisher. After studies at the Ecoles des Beaux Arts in Paris, Cassandre adopted France as his country. He produced his first poster Au Bucheron at 22, and became a successful and influential poster artist best known for his epoch-defining travelpostersand for his advertisements for products such as Dubonnet. The consummate art deco artist, he tried to create posters for people who did not try to see them. In 1936 he traveled to America to work on several projects. While there he designed several surrealistic covers for Alexey Brodovitch at Harper's Bazaar. In addition, he created for NW Ayers, the classic eye of the Ford billboard and several pieces for the Container Corporation of America. His career as a poster designer ended in 1939 when he changed disciplines and became a stage, set and theatrical designer. Most of Cassandre's work was done at Fonderie Deberny&Peignot. The 1960s work was at Olivetti. He created these typefaces: Bifur(1928-1929). See the digital form by Richard Kegler(P22, 2004). Acier Noir (1930-1936). His posterNord Express(1927) (Acier Noir really) inspired Nick Curtis to draw Nord Express NF. Peignot(1933-1937, designed with Charles Peignot for Deberny & Peignot). Typefaces like this are called Peignotian on my site; some are calling them modulated sans typefaces. Buy a digital version from Linotype. See this posterby Matt Blaisdell, this poster by Julieta Liberson, and this posterby Guillaume Bret. Noteworthy digital revivals include the rounded multi-style family Pinot Grigio Modern(2014, Alan Meeks) and Greyhound(2012, SoftMaker). Touraine (1947). Done with Charles Peignot, it is based on a design of Guillermo Mendoza. This Peignotian typeface was revived ca. 2014 by Clément Bonnetin. Cassandre (1968). Cassandre (1968) was largely unfinished, after having been turned down by Berthold and Olivetti (and was possibly the cause of his suicide). It was finished in a revival of sorts by Thierry Puyfoulhoux(2003). Graphica81 (1960). Cassandre Initials (1927). This artsy typeface was digitized by Gerd Wiescher at Elsner&Flake. Books: A.M. Cassandre, "L'architecture, l'art que je préfère à tous les autres."(2008) is a small PDF file/essay by Estienne student Antoine Stevenot. In 1988, Letraset published Baseline 10 The Cassandre issue, a fifty-page magazine volume edited by Mike Daines and art directed by Newell and Sorrell. References: Blaie Cendrars: Le spectacle est dans la rue, Montrouge, Draegr Frères, 1935. Has Cassandre's posters. Paul van Capelleveen, Sophie Ham, Jordy Joubij: Voix et visions. La Collection Koopman et l'Art du Livre français, Zwolle, Waanders, 2009. Peter van Dam, Philip van Praag: A.M. Cassandre en zijn Nederlandse opdrachtgevers 1927-1931: Catalogue raisonné. Abcoude, Uitgeverij Uniepers, 1999. Henri Mouron: Cassandre, London, Thames and Hudson, 1985. Maximilien Vox: A.M. Cassandre, peintre d'affiches, St-Gall, Zollikofer, 1948. N.R.A. Vroom: A.M. Cassandre, Amsterdam, Rijksacademie van Beeldende Kunsten, 1967. Klingspor link. FontShop link. Home page. Wikipedia link. [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Aleks Melnik Aleks Melnik (Linework Stock, Ukraine) designed the EOS-format cartoon typeface Sound Effects (2016). Creative Market link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Aleksandr Chechikov Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of Blueprint Alphabet (2014, a sketched typeface). [Google][More]  ⦿ Aleksandra Tsarenko Donetsk, Ukraine-based designer of the thick brush typeface Always (2017). [Google][More]  ⦿ Aleksey Kaplaukh Kharkiv, Ukraine-based designer of the Latin / Cyrillic display typefaces KhTZ (2017) and Apostol (2017), the Cyrillic sans typeface Svytoy (2017) and the post-punk typeface Losevo Grotesk (2017). [Google][More]  ⦿ Aleksey Nelubov Graphic designer and photographer in Odessa, Ukraine. He created a number of great logotypesthat could serve as dingbats for many applications, especially in vodka bars. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alen Zdorova Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the experimental spray bottle Cyrillic typeface Mr. Font (2016). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alena Morgunova Aka Malena. Kharkiv, Ukraine-based designer of these typefaces: In 2017: Grid and the dog-themed typeface Lovely Rustica. In 2018: Bright Gouache, Summertime (bitmap color font), Junior (bitmap color font), Stork, Malarstvo (artistic; inspired by the lettering of Ukrainian artist Vasyl Krychevsky (1873-1952)), the Latin / Cyrillic bitmap color font Happy Pencil, the color font Mosaic, Mosaik Black, and the brush font Plan Pen. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alena Sipilova Peravalsk, Ukraine-based designer of the Latin ornamental caps font Vintage (2015). [Google][More]  ⦿ Aleskey Popovcev Graphic designer and typographer in Kharkov, Ukraine. Creator of the beautifil Latin/Cyrillic sans typeface Garnitura Nachalnaya (2014). Behance link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alex Color Ukrainian designer of the OFL familyOldSlavs (2011, Cyrillic). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alex Hlivnyk Ukrainian designer. He has a Mega Thumbs Up Icon Set (2015), a Doodle Social Icons Set (2015), and a 3d hand-crafted font called Cracked Font On Chalkboard (2015). In 2016, he made a textured vector format typeface and a colored EPS format typeface called Fairytale. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexandr Kaliberda Kharkov, Ukraine-based designer of Stencil SS (2015, :atin and Cyrillic). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexandra Alexandrova Type designer, b. 1989, Lviv, Ukraine. In 2014, with Lukyan Turetskyy at 2D Typo, she created Kalyna. This Latin and Ukrainian-Cyrillic font has asymmetrical serifs, characteristic for the Ukrainian style. It is based on Heorhiy Narbut's sketches, a well-known Ukrainian graphic artist from the early 20th century. Kalyna comes also with a set of ornaments. Still in 2014, she created the rune simulation typeface Norden (Latin and Cyrillic). Behance link. [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Alexandra Malysheva[MF Studio] [More]  ⦿ Alexandra Polukhina Zaporizhzhia, Ukraine-based designer of the hand-crafted typeface Black Point (2016). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexandra Romanenko Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the vernacular latin / Cyrillic typeface Nikopol (2019). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexey Haroshka Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine-based creatror of the freerounded sans typeface Soft Font (2015). [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexey Kuzmenko Zaporozhchyne, Ukraine-based designer of these custom (logo) typefaces in 2016: Sage (modular), Sport (techno), Space (futuristic)Shark (techno), Get Better, Juno (multiline headline face), Impossible (sans), Vintage, Faster Stronger (techno), Sheriff (Western), Airborn. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexey Malkov Graphic designer from Kiev, Ukraine. He created the geometric typeface Midnight(2010), which was inspired by Herb Lubalin. Switch Connect(2011) is a high contrast art deco face. Lighter(2011) is a techno typeface that cries speed. Times New Fuck(2011) is a Peignotian sans with stiletto terminals on some glyphs. Blamed Neverland(2011) is a connect-the-dots avant-garde display face. Vampire (2011) is a gothic octagonal face. Geometria(2011) is a minimalist straight-edged face. Behance link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexey Popovtsev Graphic designer in Kiev, Ukraine, who made Ezlo Sans (2019) and the commercial sans typeface Rothko (2018) for Latin and Cyrillic. Earlier, in 2016, he published the Latin / Cyrillic sans typeface Nachalnaya. Rentafont link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Alexey Timokhovsky Or Alex Timohovsky. Ukrainian type designer based in Kiev (b. 1983, Kiev). He has his own typefoundry in Kiev. In 2014, he designed the blackletter beer label typeface Grenadierfor Latin and Cyrillic. Behance link. [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Alexey Zlodey Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the decorative all caps typeface Column (2017). [Google][More]  ⦿ Amina Fitaeva Ukrainian designer of Lissitzky(2011). [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Kaminskaya Graphic designer in Kiev, Ukraine, who drew the Brush Cyrillic alphabet in 2016. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Kernozhitskaya Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the stitching font Ukraine (2014) and the blocky typeface Loft (2014). All fonts are for Cyrillic. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Lisenko Designer in Lviv, Ukraine. Creator of a Latin / Cyrillic typeface in 2016. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Savchenko During her studies in Lviv, Ukraine, Anastasia Savchenko designed the squarish apocalyptic and weathered typeface Platforma (2018) for Latin and Cyrillic. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Tiutiunova Kharkiv, Ukraine-based designer of the display typefaces Geometrecheskiy (2019) and Prirodnyj (2019). [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasia Wojt Lviv, Ukraine-based designer of the casual typeface Nails (2017) for Cyrillic. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasiia Dmytrenko Kharkiv, Ukraine-based designer of the multiline Cyrillic typeface Tribl (2017). [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasiia Kolodii Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the outlined hand-crafted typefaces Pear Dragon (2017), My Little Scandinavia (2017), Rosemary (2017), Lavender (2017), Sailor Jack Script (2017), Gypsy Soul (2017: textured brush style), Rosemary & Lavender (2017), Drunk Panda (2016). Typefaces from 2018: Rock n Roll Baby, Vongoforte Script, Bellontze, Summer Rock, Zimbabwe (gorgeous script), Bohemian Heart (font duo), Chase The Sun, Million Dreams (signature font). She operates as Call Me Stasya. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasiia Nalkovskaya Graphic designer in Kharkiv, Ukraine, who created the curly Cyrillic typeface Breeze in 2018. [Google][More]  ⦿ Anastasy N Kharkiv, Ukraine-based designer of several decorative typefaces, including Lock (2018). [Google][More]  ⦿ Anatolii Tytarchuk Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the (Ukrainian) Cyrillic stencil typeface M04 (2017). [Google][More]  ⦿ Andfonts (was: Andrikos)[Andrii Shevchyk] Ukrainian designer (b. 1987) of the sans display typefaces Mitroe (2017) and Andtioh (2017, perhaps useful as a neon font). In 2019, he published the very tilted script typeface Olean. [Google][MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Andrew Grabelnikov Creator of the paperclip font Mothership Connection (2009). He is located in Odessa, Ukraine. [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrew Gurmanchuk Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of Digital (2015), a Latin & Cyrillic modification of Helvetica used for an identity project. [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrew Nesterenko Zaporizhzhya, Ukraine-based graphic designer. He made an untitled Peignotian typeface for Latin and Cyrillic in 2014. Behance link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrew Shalanskiy Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the artistic hand-crafted Cyrillic typeface Afinskaya (2015). [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrey Kotko Ukrainian designer who operates as Romantic Vintage Flowers. He created several EPS format decorative caps alphabets in 2015. Creative Market link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrey Sharonov Donetsk and Kiev, Ukraine-based designer of the bubblegum / cartoon font Balloon (2015), the brush typefaces Adelina Script (2015) and Supertramp (2015), and the freesignage typeface Candy (2015). Typefaces from 2016: Americus (a weathered sign painting emulation font), Legend (Script, Serif, Sans Serif), Makers (brush), Heartland.Typefaces from 2017: Bourbon House, Aurora Script (formal calligraphic script), Bjola (an informal children;s book font full of joie de vivre). Typefaces from 2018: Gastro Kultura (hand-crafted). [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrey Yushchenko[SHCH Graphics Group] [More]  ⦿ Andrii Dostliev Donetsk, Ukraine-based designer of the freeall caps poster typeface Rybaki (2015), which was developed as a project during a type design workshop run by Viktoriya Grabowska and Verena Gerlach. Behance link. [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrii Shevchyk Born in 1987 in the Ukraine, Andrii Shevchyk published the free flowing brush script typeface Andriko(2013). [Google][More]  ⦿ Andrii Shevchyk[Andfonts (was: Andrikos)] [MyFonts][More]  ⦿ Andrij Shevchenko[Type UA] [More]  ⦿ Andrij Shevchenko[Andrij Type]


Picasso Artworks & Famous Paintings & Sculptures

Picasso Artworks & Famous Paintings & Sculptures


COOKIE USE:    Cookies help us deliver the best possible service to you. By using our site, you agree to our terms, and usage of cookies. GOT IT! The Art Story.org - Your Guide to Modern ArtMovementsArtistsTimelinesIdeasBlog Artists Pablo Picasso Art WorksPablo PicassoSpanish Draftsman, Painter, Printmaker, and Sculptor Movements and Styles: Cubism, Symbolism, Surrealism Born: October 25, 1881 - Malaga, Spain Died: April 8, 1973 - Mougins, France Important Art by Pablo PicassoThe below artworks are the most important by Pablo Picasso - that both overview the major creative periods, and highlight the greatest achievements by the artist. The Soup (1902-03)Artwork description & Analysis: La Soupe is characteristic of the somber melancholy of Picasso's Blue Period, and it was produced at the same time as a series of other pictures devoted to themes of destitution, old age, and blindness. The picture conveys something of Picasso's concern with the miserable conditions he witnessed while coming of age in Spain, and it is no doubt influenced by the religious painting he grew up with, and perhaps specifically by El Greco. But the picture is also typical of the wider Symbolist movement of the period. In later years Picasso dismissed his Blue Period works as "nothing but sentiment"; critics have often agreed with him, even though many of these pictures are iconic, and of course, now unbelievably expensive. Oil on canvas - Art Institute of Chicago Portrait of Gertrude Stein (1905)Artwork description & Analysis: Gertrude Stein was an author, close friend, and even supporter of Picasso, and was integral to his growth as an artist. This portrait, in which Stein is wearing her favorite brown velvet coat, was made just a year before Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, and marks an important stage in his evolving style. In contrast to the flat appearance of the figures and objects in some of the Blue and Rose period works, the forms in this portrait seem almost sculpted, and indeed they were influenced by the artist's discovery of archaic Iberian sculpture. One can almost sense Picasso's increased interest in depicting a human face as a series of flat planes. Stein claimed that she sat for the artist some ninety times, and although that may be an exaggeration, Picasso certainly wrestled long and hard with painting her head. After approaching it in various ways, abandoning each attempt, one day he painted it out altogether, declaring "I can't see you any longer when I look," and soon abandoned the picture. It was only some time later, and without the model in front of him, that he completed the head. Oil on canvas - Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York From Our Sponsor Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907)Artwork description & Analysis: This painting was shocking even to Picasso's closest artist friends both for its content and its execution. The subject matter of nude women was not in itself unusual, but the fact that Picasso painted the women as prostitutes in aggressively sexual postures was novel. Picasso's studies of Iberian and tribal art is most evident in the faces of three of the women, which are rendered as mask-like, suggesting that their sexuality is not just aggressive, but also primitive. Picasso also went further with his spatial experiments by abandoning the Renaissance illusion of three-dimensionality, instead presenting a radically flattened picture plane that is broken up into geometric shards, something Picasso borrowed in part from Paul Cézanne's brushwork. For instance, the leg of the woman on the left is painted as if seen from several points of view simultaneously; it is difficult to distinguish the leg from the negative space around it making it appear as if the two are both in the foreground. The painting was widely thought to be immoral when it was finally exhibited in public in 1916. Braque is one of the few artists who studied it intently in 1907, leading directly to his Cubist collaborations with Picasso. Because Les Demoiselles predicted some of the characteristics of Cubism, the work is considered proto or pre Cubism. Oil on canvas - Museum of Modern Art, New York Artwork Images Still Life with Chair Caning (1912)Artwork description & Analysis: Still Life with Chair Caning is celebrated for being modern art's first collage. Picasso had affixed preexisting objects to his canvases before, but this picture marks the first time he did so with such playful and emphatic intent. The chair caning in the picture in fact comes from a piece of printed oilcloth - and not, as the title suggests, an actual piece of chair caning. But the rope around the canvas is very real, and serves to evoke the carved border of a café table. Furthermore, the viewer can imagine that the canvas is a glass table, and the chair caning is the actual seat of the chair that can be seen through the table. Hence the picture not only dramatically contrasts visual space as is typical of Picasso's experiments, it also confuses our sense of what it is that we are looking at. Oil on canvas - National Gallery, London From Our Sponsor Maquette for Guitar (1912)Artwork description & Analysis: Picasso's experiments with collaged elements such as those in Still Life with Chair Caning encouraged him to reconsider traditional sculpture as well. Rather than a collage, however, Maquette for Guitar is an assemblage or three-dimensional collage. Picasso took pieces of cardboard, paper, string, and wire that he then folded, threaded, and glued together, making it the first sculpture assembled from disparate parts. The work is also innovative because it is not a solid material surrounded by a void, but instead fluidly integrates mass and its surrounding void. Picasso has translated the Cubist interest in multiple perspectives and geometric form into a three-dimensional medium, using non-traditional art materials that continue to challenge the distinction between high art and popular culture as he did in Ma Jolie (1911-12). Paperboard, paper, thread, string, twine, and coated wire - Museum of Modern Art, New York Artwork Images Bowl of Fruit, Violin and Bottle (1914)Artwork description & Analysis: Picasso's Bowl of Fruit, Violin and Bottle is typical of his Synthetic Cubism, in which he uses various means - painted dots, silhouettes, grains of sand - to allude to the depicted objects. This combination of painting and mixed media is an example of the way Picasso "synthesized" color and texture - synthesizing new wholes after mentally dissecting the objects at hand. During his Analytic Cubist phase Picasso had suppressed color, so as to concentrate more on the forms and volumes of the objects, and this rationale also no doubt guided his preference for still life throughout this phase. The life of the café certainly summed up modern Parisian life for the artists - it was where he spent a good deal of time talking with other artists - but the simple array of objects also ensured that questions of symbolism and allusion might be kept under control. Oil on canvas - National Gallery, London Ma Jolie (1911-12)Artwork description & Analysis: In this work, Picasso challenges the distinction between high art and popular culture, pushing his experiments in new directions. Building on the geometric forms of Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, Picasso moves further towards abstraction by reducing color and by increasing the illusion of low-relief sculpture. Most significantly, however, Picasso included painted words on the canvas. The words, "ma jolie" on the surface not only flatten the space further, but they also liken the painting to a poster because they are painted in a font reminiscent of one used in advertising. This is the first time that an artist so blatantly uses elements of popular culture in a work of high art. Further linking the work to pop culture and to the everyday, "Ma Jolie" was also the name of a popular tune at the time as well as Picasso's nickname for his girlfriend. Oil on canvas - Museum of Modern Art, New York The Three Musicians (1921)Artwork description & Analysis: Picasso painted two version of this picture. The slightly smaller version hangs in the Philadelphia Museum of Art, but both are unusually large for Picasso's Cubist period, and he may have chosen to work on this grand scale because they mark the conclusion of his Synthetic Cubism, which had occupied him for nearly a decade. He painted it in the same summer as the very different, classical painting Three Women at the Spring. Some have interpreted the pictures as nostalgic remembrances of the artist's early days: Picasso sits in the center - as ever the Harlequin - and his old friends Guillaume Apollinaire, who died in 1918, and Max Jacob, from whom he had become estranged, sit on either side. However, another argument links the pictures to Picasso's work for the Ballets Russes, and identifies the characters with more recent friends. Either way, the costumes of the figures certainly derive from traditions in Italian popular theatre. Oil on canvas - Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia Artwork Images Three Women at the Spring (1921)Artwork description & Analysis: Picasso made careful studies in preparation for this, his most ambitious treatment of what is an old classical subject. It makes reference to earlier pictures by Poussin and Ingres - titans of classical painting - but it also draws inspiration from Greek sculpture, and indeed the massive gravity of the figures is very sculptural. Critics have speculated that the subject appealed to him because of the recent birth of his first son, Paulo; the somber attitude of the figures may be explained by the contemporary preoccupation in France with mourning the dead of the First World War. Oil on canvas - Museum of Modern Art, New York Artwork Images Large Nude in a Red Armchair (1929)Artwork description & Analysis: When Picasso's work came under the influence of the Surrealists in the late 1920s, his forms often took on melting, organic contours. This work was completed in May 1929, around the same time the Surrealists were preoccupied with the way in which ugly and disgusting imagery might provide a route into the unconscious. It was clearly intended to shock, and it may have been influenced by Salvador Dalí - and Joan Miro. It is thought that the picture represents the former dancer Olga Koklova, whose relationship with Picasso was failing around this time. Oil on canvas - Musée National Picasso, Paris Guernica (1937)Artwork description & Analysis: This painting was Picasso's response to the bombing of the Basque town named Guernica on April 26, 1937 during the Spanish Civil War. Painted in one month - from May to June 1937 - it became the centerpiece of the Spanish pavilion at the Paris World's Fair later that year. While it was a sensation at the fair, it was consequently banned from exhibition in Spain until military dictator Francisco Franco fell from power in 1975. Much time has been spent trying to decode the symbolism of the picture, and some believe that the dying horse in the center of the painting alludes to the people of Spain. The minotaur may allude to bull fighting, a favorite national past-time in Spain, though it also had complex personal significance for the artist. Although Guernica is undoubtedly modern art's most famous response to war, critics have been divided on its success as a painting. Oil on canvas - Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid Share on FacebookShare on TwitterSubscribe to The Art Story Share on FacebookShare on TwitterBy submitting the above you agree to The Art Storyprivacy policy. Welcome to The Art Story! Error occured while saving data... Please, try again later. Like The Art Story on Facebook Like The Art Story on Facebook More on Pablo Picasso Including Overview, Key Ideas, Biography, Useful Resources, and Related Topics to Pablo Picasso


The Fall (2006) — Art of the Title

The opening title sequence for Tarsem's The Fall is the perfect example of a director's absolute control over his vision. To view it after seeing the film is a gift; a rare and beautiful thing. Surreal, extravagant, and a world singularly Tarsem. What is it to sense things in such a way? Scored to Beethoven's Symphony No. 7 In A Major, Op. 92 (2-Allegretto), the visuals hit their money notes in quick succession. The bridge becomes a stage and the caballus curtain rises as the sequence concludes. It is a dream, and we are Dorothy, remembering the players. From Tarsem Singh's DVD commentary: "It is hard to define... I wanted chaos without energy." Audio commentary excerpt with director Singh (contains spoilers):


Bembo

Bembo


Jump to navigationJump to searchFor the Italian poet, humanist, cardinal, and literary theorist, see Pietro Bembo. CategorySerifClassificationOld-styleDesigner(s)Francesco GriffoGiovanni Antonio TaglienteMonotype drawing officeAlfred FairbankFoundryMonotypeVariationsBembo TitlingBembo Condensed Italic (Fairbank)Shown hereET BemboBembo is a seriftypefacecreated by the British branch of the Monotype Corporationin 1928-9 and most commonly used for body text. It is a member of the "old-style" of serif fonts, with its regular or romanstyle based on a design cut around 1495 by Francesco Griffofor Venetianprinter Aldus Manutius, sometimes generically called the "Aldine roman". Bembo is named for Manutius's first publication with it, a small 1496 book by the poet and cleric Pietro Bembo. The italicis based on work by Giovanni Antonio Tagliente, a calligrapher who worked as a printer in the 1520s, after the time of Manutius and Griffo. Monotype created Bembo during a period of renewed interest in the printing of the Italian Renaissance, under the influence of Monotype executive and printing historian Stanley Morison. It followed a previous more faithful revival of Manutius's work, Poliphilus, whose reputation it largely eclipsed. Monotype also created a second, much more eccentric italic for it to the design of calligrapher Alfred Fairbank, which also did not receive the same attention as the normal version of Bembo. Since its creation, Bembo has enjoyed continuing popularity as an attractive, legible book typeface. Prominent users of Bembo have included Penguin Books, the Everyman's Libraryseries, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, the National Gallery, Yale University Pressand Edward Tufte. Bembo has been released in versions for phototypesettingand in several revivals as digital fontsby Monotype and other companies. Contents


Antique Mettlach | Pottery & Porcelain Price Guide

Antique Mettlach | Pottery & Porcelain Price Guide


MettlachMettlach, Germany, is the city where Villeroy and Boch worked. Steins from the firm are marked with the word Mettlach or the castle mark They date from about 1842. Styles of Mettlach steins include relief "tree trunk" style, etched, relief, cameo, and print under glaze (PUG)—as well as specialty types. The steins can be dated from the marks on the bottom, which include a date-number code. Other pieces may be listed in the Villeroy & Boch category..


Culture

Culture


We've noticed you're adblocking.We rely on advertising to help fund our award-winning journalism. We urge you to turn off your ad blocker for The Telegraph website so that you can continue to access our quality content in the future. Thank you for your support. Need help? Visit our adblocking instructions


Decades Vintage Company

Decades Vintage Company


Decades Vintage Company is one of Portland's best sources for vintage and antique costume jewelry. We carry a wide variety of delectable baubles. From 1930's bakelite to 1950's rhinestone pieces to antique lockets and cameos. So you'll find a little something for every taste. This list of jewelry makers is offered in the hopes you'll find it helpful. New brands are added as they come up. Feel free to contact us should you have information about a company not seen below.To shop by brand name click on any manufacturer highlighted in red. The following are a list of jewelry manufacturers and the approximate dates when they were made as a guide for beginning collectors. Art / ModeArt- 1950’s -1970’sQuite prolific, Arthur Pepper's company Modeart produced a wide variety of styles including florals, figurals, and Chistmas tree pins as well as other holiday designs.Accessocraft - 1935 - 1998Accessocraft's claim to fame was their war relief pins in which all profits were donated to charity during World War II. In later decades the company produced the jewelry designs of Pauline Trigere and Anne Klein.Amco - 1919 - 1970'sKnown for their gold filled, and sterling silver jewelry this American manufacturer went out of business in the 1970's. Among other things they sold necklace and earring gift sets in very presentable hinged gift boxes.Austria- This mark simply denotes that the piece was made in Austria and the rhinestones in the piece are likely Austrian crystal.Avon- 1971 - PresentAlthough Avon is not widely collected is is worth noting that Kenneth J. Lane designed some pieces exclusively marketed by Avon which were marked K.J.L. for Avon from 1986 to 1995. Other designers for Avon include Celia Sebiri, Elizabeth Taylor and Louis Feraud.Aksel Holmsen-1932 - ?Aksel Holmsenis a Norwegian maker of sterling silver jewelry. The company was founded by Aksel Holmsen Smithy in 1932 in Sandefjord Norway. The company is well known for modernist style and guilloche and basse-taille enameled pieces as well as gold plated sterling jewelry.Barclay - 1946 -1957Very nice mid-century modern designs classic to this era. Not to be confused with McClelland Barclay.Bergere -1946 - 1979Although not well known Bergere pieces are very high quality and pretty designs which is a great reason to have a Bergere piece in your collection.Beau Jewels - 1950's - 1970'sThis brand had some nicely designed sets. Contructed very much like Judy Lee - similar in quality and design.B. David- 1945 - 1990'sNicely made and well finished B David's work is well worth collecting. A person may want to concentrate on B David's lovely crown pins that came in a variety of multi-colored designs with pastel and aurora borealis stones.Bogoff- 1946 -1960’sHead designer and company founder Henry Bogoff’s beautiful designs are sought out by collectors today for their high quality and amazing beauty. Often the pieces had a rhodium finish which adds to the high quality of the look.Bond Boyd- 1940 to PresentEstablished in 1940 this Toronto Canada company is family owned and operated. It mainly manufactures in precious metals and makes custom corporate pins, insignia rings as well as classic maple leaf jewelry for the Canadian tourist trade.Boucher- 1937 -1971Decades recommends Marcel Boucher’s beautiful designs as being good investment pieces because of his early association with Cartier as well as the jewelry being of high quality and distinguished design. His jewelry sold in higher end stores such as Saks 5th Avenue and is currently undervalued.B.S.K. - 1948 - 1980'sMarketed through department stores like Woolworth's. Some worthwhile and substantial pieces can be found.Carnegie, Hattie- 1918 - 1976Fashion designer Hattie Carnegie began producing jewelry to compliment her clothing line in 1939. The company continued after her death in 1956 for another 20 years. Any jewelry made before her death is the most sought after by collectors. Jewelry associated with a fashion designer or house is a cross collectible and therefore commands higher prices.Carolee - 1972 - PresentCarolee jewelry will get a resounding "ho hum" from any serious collector. The rule of course is always "Buy what you like".Castlecliff- 1918 - 1977Castlecliff jewelry wasn't marked until 1941 though scholarship on this company is slightly contradictory Castlecliff produced their jewelry at least through the 1960's.Cathe - 1961 - ?Indications are that Cathe, like Judy Lee was sold at jewelry parties in the 1960’s. They tend to be fun designs with unusual art glass stones.Caviness, Alice- 1945 - 1997Another cross over from the fashion industry Alice Caviness began designing jewelry just postwar and died in 1983 although jewelry that bears her name continued to be manufactured well into the 1990’s. Well liked by collectors her older jewelry is quite pricey when found.Charel - 1945 - ?Collectors will find Charel pieces similar in design and quality to Lisner.Ciner - 1931 - PresentAlthough not highly collected any nice signed piece is worth collecting and Ciner’s older work tends to look like the real thing as the company was originally a manufacturer of fine jewelry. They switched their focus in 1931 to costume jewelry but probably only signed their work after the 2nd world war.Coro- Corocraft- 1901 - 1998Early Coro pieces such as Coro’s Duette’s (brooches that separate into two pieces) or Jelly Bellies (brooches with large lucite center stones) are quite expensive and collectible and will hold their value in the future. Later pieces from the 60’s and 70’s are much less desirable unless they are in complete 2 or 3 piece sets. In much of the later jewelry the rhinestones were glued in instead of being prong set so they are much more apt to loose stones with use or be missing stones when found.Creed - 1946 - PresentFounder William Creed started his company after returning from a stint in the Navy in WW II. The firm specializes inCatholic religious medals and rosaries. Much of the work is in sterling silver and uses high quality Czech and Austrian crystal beads.Danecraft- 1939 - PresentKnown for it’s lovely Art Nouveau designs Danecraft silver is still quite reasonably priced and as such is a good investment.David-Andersen- 1876 - PresentWell known for their enameled sterling silver jewelry, often with a leaf or floral motif. This jewelry will be marked DA Norway. Quite expensive and well collected today.Delizza & Elster- 1947 - 1990Delizza and Elster manufactured jewelry of the highest quality. Always very solidly made this company unfortunately never signed their pieces but did paper label a line called Juliana in the late 60's. More and more is known about this company's jewelry thanks to the efforts of several studious dealers and the company founder himself.De Mario- 1945 - 1960’sAt first glance many of Robert De Mario’s faux pearl designs look much like Miriam Haskell’s work with lovely gold tone filigree. The DeMario jewelry I’ve come across is very beautiful but has not held up well with time. If stored in a damp or humid climate (like a damp Oregon basement) this jewelry is likely to have some green corrosion known as verdigris on the metal parts. This corrosion is irreversible and usually not cleanable as once it's cleaned there will be black undernieth it. Stay away from any piece that shows this type of damage.Diamonbar- 1905 - 1930'sDiamonbar was a trademark name by Wachenheimer Brothers based in Providence Rhode Island. They made high quality sterling jewelry with rhinestones in art deco styles. The Diamonbar name was used after the 1917trademark.Dior, Christian- 1947 - PresentDior’s untimely death in 1957 at the height of his career was a huge loss to the fashion world. His design sensibility ruled the post war world with the introduction of his New Look. Any of his jewelry designs from this era would command a very high price - if you could get your hands on one. Most of what a collector can find today will be licensed jewelry from the 80’s or 90’s and should be reasonably priced.DuBarry- 1950's - 1960'sPaper labels say "An original Du Barry, Fifth Avenue, Ft.Lauderdale". This company had a line of very inexpensive costume jewelry including plastic bangles and clip earrings - some hand painted and manufactured in Hong Kong.Other items include Cloudsilk compacts which have the paper label DuBarry Div. New York, Paris.Eisenberg- 1914 - PresentEisenberg is one of the most collected of the vintage jewelry brands and is still in business today. Originally they were a clothing manufacturer that also produced dress clips and rhinestone buckles to adorn their dresses. These clips became so popular that the company started to manufacture them to be sold on their own. Eventually in the 1950’s Eisenberg gave up on the clothing business altogether in order to concentrate on their jewelry line. Most collectible today are the earlier art deco pieces marked Eisenberg Originals. Most of the 1940's pieces are also marked Sterling. 1950's pieces are usually marked Eisenberg Ice. Many people are also collecting their colorful Christmas tree pins which are often available at Nordstom seasonally.Elzac - 1940'sKnown for their fabulous ethnic face pins in lucite and ceramic, Elzac's figural pins have increased in value over the years often fetching $100 or more.Emmons- 1949 -1981Sold at home Tupperware style parties. The same parent company as Sarah Coventry but a bit better quality.Eugene - Early 1950's - 1960'sThis designer for Miriam Haskell's jewelry line broke out on his own in the early 1950's. Working out of New York, Eugene continued to design Haskell-esque jewelry. Very high quality and beautiful Eugene's jewelry is sure to increase in value.Florenza- 1948 - 1981Florenza is quite well thought of by dealers and collectors today. The signature look is gold tone or antiqued gold tone settings with large colorful rhinestones. Named to honor his wife Florence, Dan Kassoff’s company also manufactured pieces for other quality jewelry companies of the time.Gale - 1955 -?The jewelry I’ve seen from this company has been higher quality prong set rhinestone sets. Although not well known this company’s jewelry is harder to find than other manufacturers of the time and it’s for this reason that I recommend picking it up when you can find a nice piece in mint condition.Garne -1945 - 1960’sNice mid-century designs were the trademark style of this New York based company.Gem-tone - Dates UnknownThis is a paper labelcompany which manufactured reverse carved lucite jewelry.Givenchy - 1952 - PresentAnother notable fashion house Givenchy was founded by Hubert de Givenchy in 1952. This French designer’s work is highly collectible and the house is still a major presence in the fashion world.Goldette- 1958 - 1970'sGoldette often styled their jewelry to look like parts of Victorian fine jewelry were pieced together and made by a jeweler into a bracelet or a brooch.Grossé- 1907 - PresentA German company founded by Heinrich Henkel and Florentin Grossé. Famous for their partnership to manufacture the jewelry of Christian Dior and other notable designers.Georg Jensen- 1904 - PresentGeorg Jensen founded his silver company in 1904 and died in 1935 but his company and legacy live on. Collectors of modern design covet the work from this company which include pieces from modern architect Arne Jacobsen of Ant and Swan chair fame. Jewelry with the Georg Jensen mark commands very high prices in today’s market. Even a small unassuming brooch can fetch over $200. The older more intricate jewelry would make fine investment pieces.Hagler, Stanley- 1950's - presentStanley Hagler designed jewelry that was large and important looking and was able to curry favor with a wealthy clientele inlcuding movie stars and even the Duchess of Windsor. He used tiny seed beads and Austrian crystal rhinestones in great floral designs and some of the work would remind one of Haskell's designs (whom he worked for for a short time in the 1940's). He was a guest designer for De Mario in 1966 and in 1968 won the Swarovski Design Award. Though Hagler died in 1996 the company contiued after his death.Har- 1955 -1960’sHar is the signature brand of Hargo Creations. This company was founded in 1955 by Joseph Heibronner and his wife Edith Levitt. Quite rare and always fabulous Har’s fantasy pieces are a great find for any collector. Expect prices to be quite high.Haskell, Miriam- 1924 - PresentBest known for her faux pearl jewelry Haskell’s work is wonderfully intricate and beautiful. With hoards of fans including dealers and collectors alike, Miriam Haskell jewelry remains quite high in price and for good reason. Haskell used the highest quality materials and the beauty of the work speaks for itself.Hickok- 1909 - 1970'sHickok was one of many companiesthat specialized in men's jewelry and accessories. Much of it was art deco or mid century modern in design. These were marketed in beautiful bakelite and plastic boxes which will be marked Hickok on the bottom with the company crest.Hobé- 1927 - 1990’sWilliam Hobe founded the American Hobe Cie jewelry company in 1927 and sold mainly through high end stores. From bead work to rhinestones to sterling Hobe’s pieces are always top quality and are prized by collectors today.Hollycraft- 1948 - 1971Hollycraft was the trademark of the Hollywood Jewelry Manufacturing Company. Hollycraft has a signature look usually characterized by multi colored pastel rhinestones on a gold tone or antiqued gold tone setting. Though very pretty Hollycraft rhinestone jewelry is rarely prong set so check the piece over very carefully for missing stones.Iskin, Harry- 1930's - 1953Quality jewelry made in sterling, gold fill, and vermeil. Designed in classic 1940's retro style as well as art deco and enameled marcasite pieces. The Hallmark is a capitol H with a capitol I in the center.Jeray - 1940'sCollectible and rarer, designs are true to the "retro" style of the 1940's.Jomaz - 1946 - 1981An offshoot of the Mazer Brothers Company, Joseph Mazer founded his company in 1946. Some of the jewelry by Jomaz was designed by Andre Fleuidas in the 1950’s and more recently Adolfo in the 1970’s.Jonette Jewelry- 1944 - 2006Most of what a collector will find today will be whimsical pins of very little value. Collecting the sterling pins would be a better bet for future investment. Look for JJ in a diamond cartouche with the word Sterling above it.Jonne - 1950's - 1962It is unclear when Jonne's parent company Schrager started producing Jonne jewelry but the company closed in 1962. Jewelry by this company has a signature look. Sort of a cross between Miriam Haskell and Stanley Hagler. It is made in the same way Haskell, Eugene, DeMario and Robert made their jewlery and collectors should look out for the same kind of green corosion that plagues the vintage jewelry of those other companies.Joseff of Hollywood- 1935 - PresentEugene Joseff, a designer of jewelry for Hollywood films founded Joseff of Hollywood in 1935 and continued designing for the company until his death in 1948. His widow Joan Castle took over operations of the company after that and later pieces may bear her name. Joseff’s work can be seen in a myriad of films ranging from Gone With The Wind to Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The association to such films and to many movie stars who wore his jewelry keeps prices for his jewelry very high.Judy Lee - 1958 - 1980’sSold in Tupperware style jewelry parties the Judy Lee brand is not widely collected which makes it a pretty good buy as it’s moderately priced and the pieces were usually well put together and nicely designed.Juliana- 1967 - 1968Recently discovered by collectors Juliana is the house brand label of Delizza and Elster. This company’s high quality rhinestone jewelry is unmarked and can only be identified through particular manufacturing techniques or original paper labels.Karu-1940 - 1970’sAt first glance Karu’s quality designs look much like the work of other quality manufacturers like Weiss or Weisner. Though not well known Karu’s jewelry is well made and as such is quite collectible.Kevia- 2007 - Present - Designer Kevia Jeffrey -West started her jewelry business out of her home after graduating from college. Her early work was primarily gold plated sterling silver adorned with semi precious stones. By 2012 Kevia had launched a line of jewelry influenced by vintage designs that she named the Decades line saying she was inspired by Decades Vintage Company's owner John Cosgrove. This up and coming designer also has a new line of fine jewelry and her work has been sold by the likes of Anthropology and Saks Fifth Avenue and is currently popular with celebrities and Hollywood stylists. Kevia jewelry is sure to hold it's value in the future because of the quality of materials and design.Kramer- 1943 - 1979Also marked Kramer of New York, Kramer jewelry is avidly collected as it is always high quality and well designed. Prices of Kramer jewelry are quite reasonable considering quality and demand. The marks Kramer and Kramer of New York were in use at the same time.Krementz - 1866 - PresentKrementz is best known for it’s gold filled jewelry from the art deco to mid-century periods. Krementz made men’s cuff links, tie clips, collar buttons and a full line of women’s jewelry as well.Lane, Kenneth J- 1963 - PresentAfter working for Vogue and Dior, Kenneth Jay Lane (K.J.L.) founds his own costume jewelry business in 1963. His designs adorned a long list of notables from Liz Taylor to Princess Dianna and he is still in business today. He designed for Avon as well from 1985 to 1996 with the mark KJL for Avon.Lang- 1940's - 1970's?This company made cute little figural sterling silver jewelry. They signed their silver Sterling, Lang with the S in the word Sterling being a stylized swan.Laguna- 1944 - 1980'sIf multi-strand necklaces are your thing Laguna is right up your alley. Laguna often used colorful art glass beads in their work. Strangely interspersing plastic beads with beautiful glass ones they somehow make this work with stunning results. You'll find the signature on the hook clasp.La Rel - 1953 - ?New York manufacturer La Rel made "rhinestone magic" for some time in the 1950's catering to the younger market. Simple, tasteful and well made their hang tags bragged that it was non-tarnishable.Larin, Robert - 1968 - 1972Canadian modernist Robert Larin was working out of Montreal in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Most pieces are signed R. Larin and are made from cast pewter.Les Bernard - 1963 - 1996Bernard Shapiro, son of Harold Shapiro of the Vogue jewelry company joined forces with Lester Joy and formed the LesBernard company in 1963. Because it is more recent the Les Bernard company’s jewelry is not highly collectible as yet but many pretty pieces can be found quite reasonably today for just that reason.Leru- 1956 - 1960'sClassic mid-century designs, you'll find the look similar to Coro and Lisner. Lots of moon glow lucite sets as well as thermoset plastic and rhinestone pieces.Lisner- 1904 - 1979With a long history of jewelry manufacturing the Lisner pieces a collector is likely to find today date from the 1950’s and 60’s when costume jewelry was at it’s height. Like the later Coro pieces much of Lisner’s later pieces did not use prong set stones and as the result often lose stones with storage and wear. Some of the better of the future collectible Lisner are the pieces with plastic elements like leaves or flowers. Try to buy these in full sets if possible but it shouldn’t be hard to piece together a set if you found a single piece you like as Lisner jewelry is quite common.Liza- 1980's - As with most makers the style of the jewelry reflects the time period. In this case big, brassy gold tone pieces - some gold plated. Pieces are signed Liza. Paper labels indicate the company was based in Dallas and London originally producing only fine jewelry then producing a costume jewelry line.Mandle- 1938 - 1948Very rare and often unmarked. Mainly enameled figural brooches with classic 1940's styles. Urie Mandle's son Robert started his own company in the late 1950's and his jewelry is marked R. Mandle.Marvella - 1911 - PresentMarvella sold a wide aray of nice pieces including figural brooches, multi strand necklaces, full sets and faux pearls.Matisse- 1952 - 1964See Renoir.Mazer - 1923 - 1981Joseph and Louis Mazer started their company in the 1920's and their jewelry was marked Mazer Bros. from 1926 to 1951. The mark Mazer was used from 1946 to the company closed in 1981. Marcel Boucher designed for the Mazer Bros company for a time before striking out on his own in 1937. Joseph Mazer left the Mazer Brothers company in 1946 to start Joseph J. Mazer & Co. The Mazer and Jomaz marks were first used in 1946. See also Jomaz.McClelland - Barclay- 1935 - 1943Fabulous multi-color art deco is the signature look of this company's prized pieces. Marked McClelland - Barclay and sometimes Barclay it might be confused with Barclay (1946-1957) but the signature font is different as is the look of the jewelry.Moini, Iradj- 1989 - PresentIIradj Moini had been a jewelry designer for Oscar de la Renta before striking out on his own. His work regularly graces the covers of fashion magazines such as Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Marie Claire and Elle Magazines. He has been exhibited in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and is in the permanent collections of the Louvre in Paris. His jewelry is usually quite large and always fabulous. Moini's work often utilizes natural stones mixed with Swarovski crystals to striking effectMonet- 1937 - PresentLike Trifari the key to collecting Monet is to buy the older pieces as Monet is easy to find at department stores at reduced prices most of what I see around tends to be made within the last 2 decades and is quite easy to find.Mosain - 1920's - 1930'sThough I know next to nothing about this company I have seen this name on classic 1920's gold filled art deco cuff linkssimilar in style and quality to Krementz.Mosell - 1940 - 1980 - Frederick Mosell is probably best known for his Egyptian revival pieces. Large gold tone cuff bracelets and matching bib necklaces and earrings some resembling gold lace.Napier- 1922 - PresentAnother maker that is currently in business selling through large department stores is Napier. Early pieces will be hard to find but the newer pieces are plentiful and prices are cheap.Ora- 1921 - PresentOra's beautiful art deco designs were great quality and are being produced today from the original molds. For this reason collectors should be shy about buying a piece without knowing the provenance.Original By Robért- 1940's - 1979This company is highly regarded and made some very lovely jewelry producing sterling silver rhinestone designs in the 1940's and moving into beaded and faux pearls in the 1950's and 60's. Designs from the latter era look much like the work of Robert's contemporaries De Mario, Eugene and Miriam Haskell and are equal in quality. Company founder Robert Levy won the Coty Award for excellence in design in 1960.Otis - 1934 - 1970In the mid 1930s Edward Otis purchased the Wachenheimer Brothers jewelry company famous for their Diamonbar line of sterling silver rhinestone jewelry. Otis continued to produce Diamonbar and WB designs well into the 1940s and closed in 1970.Pakula - dates unknownPakula is not a well known brand to collectors but manufactured gift sets as well as wholesaled other brands of costume jewelry including Whiting and Davis and Anson - a brand of mens jewelry. Because their work was unsigned most of their work is lost in anonymity. They marketed their jewelry in gift boxes with the name Pakula Originals printed inside. Classic mid-century designs, floral motifs and hand set rhinestones are the norm for this company.Panetta-1945 -1995Designer Beneditto Panetta started his company in 1945 after working for both Trifari and Pennino. Collectors appreciate the high quality of his work and prices reflect that.Park Lane- 1955 - PresentFounded by Arthur and Shirley Levin this company sells their jewelry at home based parties. Some nice pieces can be found. Prices and quality are all over the map. Buy what you like!Pell - 1941 - PresentThis company is still in business manufacturing jewelry and is headquartered in Astoria, N.Y.Pennino- 1926 - 1961Brothers Frank and Oreste Pennino started their company in 1926. Austrian crystal rhinestones and vermeil were often used and this jewelry is very collectible in today’s market.Phyllis - 1940’s - 1960’sWell made, though not well known the Phyllis jewelry company sometimes used sterling silver settings.PS Co - 1905 - PresentPlainville Stock Company made lovely art deco and filigree jewelry peices based on the fine jewelry styles of the period.H. Pomerantz- 1940's - 1960'sFounded by Herman Pomerantz, jewelry by this designer is quite rare and very little had been known about the company. Luckily Mr. Pomerantz's granddaughter contacted Decades recently. According to his granddaughter Herman passed away in 1967 and his original sketch books as well as any left over sample jewelry was unforturnately thrown out. Most pieces are marked H POMERANTZ INC. N.Y.Rader, Pauline - 1963 - 1980'sFun designs like her fly brooch with trembling wings attached to springs are great pieces for any collection.Rebajes- 1941 - present - Francisco Rebajes was a brilliant moderist jewelry designer and sculptor. Much of his jewelry work is in copper or sterling silver and his peices have been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world. Originally from the Dominican Republic Rebajes imigrated to New York as a teenager. Having very little means in his beginnings Rebajes work was unexpectedly discovered by the director of the Whitney Museum and with this exposure his career took off. This enabled him to open a store in Greenwich village and later on 5th avenue. All the pieces were handmade though not neccessarily by him. He hired Otto Bade to make the jewelry in the early 1940's who later oversaw all the work and eventually bought the company from Rebajes in 1960. Jewelry bearing the Rebajes signature is still manufactured today.Regency- 1950’s - 1970’sI’m a big fan of Regency jewelry. It is always of the highest quality and they often used unusually shaped molded stones that look like leaves. Their beautiful color combinations and quality settings were often Japanned and were always well designed. I highly recommend Regency jewelry for all of the above reasons.Reinad- 1922 - 1950'sThis New York company's jewelry is fairly rare. Though not much is known about the company the quality of the jewelry speaks for itself.Reja - 1939 - 1953From 1939 to 1941 marked Deja. Like most jewlery manufacturers of the time this company worked through the war years in sterling silver adding rhinestones for color. The designs are classic retro.Renior- 1946 - 1964This beautiful copper based jewelry is usually modernist in design reflecting mid 20th century design esthetics. My favorites of these are the multicolored enameled pieces made by Renoir’s sister company Matisse which opened in 1952. This jewelry has lots of fans and is much harder to find than it used to be. Snap it up next time you see a piece you like.Rifus - 1960 - ?Frank Rifus founded his comany in Chicago in 1960. This was a great brand but no one seems to know much about it. Quite rare, high quality and beautiful.Some pieces were rhodium plated. Rhodium is a rust free element that today is about the same price as gold on the metals market.Roger Van S- 1945 - 1960'sBetter known for thier award winning purses and belts Roger Van S designs were the brain child of Mrs. Doris Van Schoyck who went by Mrs. Roger Van S. But they also had a line of costume jewelry comparable in quality and design to Trifari.Roma - 1960's - ?This is the trademark name of jewelry made by the Fairdeal Manufacturing Company. Gold tone jewelry likely to resemble that of Trifari pieces of the era.Roth-Feder - Late 19th century - 1930's - Signed either Roth-Feder or Roth & Feder there is not a wealth of knowledge about this company but they manufactured rhinestone belt buckles as well as brooches and clips much of it in art deco styles.Rosenstein, Nettie- 1935 - 1975The Austrian born fashion designer Nettie Rosenstein imigrated to New York as a child and grew up in Harlem. She began producing clothing for I. Magnin in 1919. Her career flourished throughout the 1920's through the 1950's. Like many other fashion designers she added a line of jewelry to accent her clothes in 1935. Rosenstein retired in 1961 leaving her business partner, Coty Award winning designer Sol Klein to continue the jewelry and accessory business until he retired in 1975. Look for her silver vermiel pieces with colorful enamel. Rosenstein's jewelry is quite rare and was very expensive at the time.Sarah Coventry- 1949 - 1983This once sleeper brand has become quite collectible in recent years. Medium quality work. Was mostly sold at home parties like Avon.Scaasi - 1958 - present - Arnold Scaasi's lovely jewelry certainly turns heads. He is a fashion designer as well as a jewlry designer and sells mainly on HSN these days.Schiaparelli,Elsa- 1930’s - 1960’sFrom surrealism in fashion design to shocking pink, Schiaparelli’s designs and reputation speak for themselves. The legendary fashion designer created jewelry designs as well. Very colorful, high quality bold designs are her signature look. Very collectible, very expensive, jewelry with her signature will hold it’s value for years to come. Beware of fake Schiaparelli jewelry in which the name is misspelled.Schreiner- 1939 - 1977High quality and beautiful, this New York maker’s designs are quite desirable now. Known for “reversing” the rhinestones so the facets catch the light. Schreiner often used unfoiled Austrian crystal rhinestones so the stones could be mounted "upside down".Selro - 1940's - 1970'sFounded by Paul Selenger in New York in the late 1940's. This jewelry has a signature look using ethnic looking faces or masks as center pieces in brooches or as links on a bracelet or even drops on bolo necklaces.Simpson, Adele - 1940’s - 1970’sJewelry by American Designer Adele Simpson was produced in limited quantities and is quite rare and collectible today. Worn by every First Lady from Mamie Eisenhower to Roselin Carter her conservative clothing designs had appeal to professional women everywhere.Spiffardi- 1950'sAnother of the countless companies lost to history as their jewelry was unsigned. This company marketed their work in velvet gift boxes with a paper info sheet trumpeting the quality of their work. They called their stones Dia-mo-crys or "artificial diamonds" which were open backed crystals set by hand. As all things imported were the rage in those days they also went by the name Spiffardi of Florence Italy though the jewelry was made in the U.S.A.Stambouli, Natasha- 1980's -1990'sNatasha Stambouli designed very bold jewelry often incorporating animal or insect forms and utilizing semi precious stones and Austrian crystals in the work. It's usually 18K gold plated in a matte finishon brass. Her signature look blends a bit of ancient Etruscan styles with Victorian art nouveau and arts & crafts styles with beautiful results.Star- 1940’s -1960’sAnother of the many New York based costume jewelry makersof the mid-century styled in the classic design sensibility of the time.Staret- 1935 - 1947Not to be confused with Star or Star-Art the Staret name is the mark of Star Novelty Jewelry Company based in Chicago, Il. Highly collectible and rare Staret jewelry is well thought of and sought out by collectors. Expect prices to be high.Stein, Lea - 1969 - 1981 and 1988 - PresentLea Stein's jewelry is often mistaken for lucite, celluloid or even bakelite. Her rhodoid figural pins especially the fox pins are simple, colorful and collectible.Swank- 1936 - presentAlthough the history of this company can be traced back to the 1890's the Swank name was not used until the mid 1930's. The company was then and continues to be a quality manufacturer of men's jewelryincluding cuff links, tie clips and even necklaces. Today in addition to manufacturing their own signature line they also make jewelry for Pierre Cardin, Alexander Julian and Anne Klein among others.Taxco - Many Mexican silver designers have a huge following today. Especially designers that were working in the 1940's. During World War II shortages and rationing of brass, copper and other hard metals made silver the metal of choice for much of the jewelry of that period. Much of this work came out of a small town in Mexico called Taxco. Some pieces will be signed and some will not. Names to look for are William Spratling, Margot de Taxco, Hector Aguilar, Los Ballesteros, and Los Castillo. There are many many other silver marks and designers. Collectors of these pieces often settle into collecting the work of one or two designers. Beware of items bearing the mark "Alpaca" as they are not silver.Thune - 1857 - PresentA Norwegian company which makes beautiful fine jewelry and vermeil guilloche silver jewelry and tableware. The look of this jewelry may remind one of David-Andersen styles.Toshikane- Dates unknown - 20th CenturyThis Japanese company was headquartered in Tokyo and made colorful enameled art ceramic jewelry and buttons. Much of the jewelry was mounted on fine silver and used classic Japanese motifs such as Samurai, Mt Fiji, the Seven Immortals and Japanese fans. Original paper insterts boasted about their "Exquisiteness in carving and delicacy in colouring - all done by hand. The highest skill in ceramic attainedby ceramic art in Japan".Trifari- 1918 - PresentWith Trifari as with any maker that is still producing jewelry the key is collecting the older stuff. The Trifari Jelly Belly as well as the Coro versions are sought after today bringing high prices as they have been collected for many years.Vendome- 1944 - 1979Known to collectors for beautiful bead work Vendome’s parent company Coro started using this name for their higher end jewelry in 1944. Eventually in the 1950’s the Vendome brand had a full line of superb jewelry.Vogue- 1936 - 1973Known for high quality beadwork in the 1940's and 1950's. I prefer their modernist pieces of the 1960's.Volupte - 1926 - 1950’sBetter known for their elegant compacts Volupte had a very nice line of jewelry in the 1950’s.Warner- 1953 - 1971Joseph Warner’s lovely rhinestone jewelry is solidly made and could remind one of other makers such as Karu, Weiss or Regency. Also of note are his “blooming” mechanical flower pins which open and close by moving a lever.Weiss- 1942 -1971Weiss is a maker that used Austrian crystal rhinestones. Weiss jewelry is widely collected today but is still reasonably priced. Most Weiss jewelry uses prong set stones on beautiful settings. Some of their later work is not as high quality with the stones just glued in. Check these pieces over carefully for missing or replaced stones and pass on them if they are not perfect.Weisner, Joseph- 1950'sI haven't found any reliable information showing a connection between the jewelry marked Weisner and the accessories marked Weisner. Neither is rare by any means, both companies made lovely designs.Weisner of Miami- 1950'sThis multi faceted accessory company advertized heavily in Vogue magazine. Their Trickettes line featured compacts, perfume bottles, lipsticks, pill boxes and the like were encrusted with rhinestones, faux pearls and genuine mother of pearl.Whiting and Davis- 1876 - presentVintage clothing collectors and antique enthusiasts will recognize the Whiting and Davis name as being associated with metal mesh purses dating as far back as Victorian times. In the 1950's the company branched out to produce a line of costume jewelry that is coveted by collectors today. Look for their cuff bracelets or mesh bib necklaces.

source : international currency ,Welcome to reprint and share。

Related articles

Some netizens have made a critical comment. What are you waiting for?Come on

Required

Optional

Optional

Remember, I don't need to re-enter my personal information next time