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Release time:2019-03-13
Japanese Friendship Garden

The Japanese Friendship Garden ("the Garden") is an expression of friendship between San Diego and its sister city, Yokohama. It illustrates two cultures and creates an immersive experience into Japanese culture. The Garden's design is based on centuries-old Japanese techniques adapted to San Diego's climate and florae and seeks to foster a relationship between humans and nature, providing a respite attuned to Japanese simplicity, serenity, and aestheticism. The Garden sits on a 12-acre plot. It offers a variety of educational programs, exhibits, and festivals as well as accredited horticultural classes to enhance and deepen visitor appreciation for Japanese culture. As a valued community resource, it is well known for its unique setting, stone arrangements, koi ponds, water features, sukiya-style buildings and landscape


The Garden

Our Mission: The mission of the Japanese Friendship Garden Society of San Diego is to develop a traditional Japanese garden as a center to educate, engage, and inspire people of diverse backgrounds about Japanese culture and community legacy. OUR STORY: The Japanese Friendship Garden (JFG) is an expression of friendship between San Diego and its sister city, Yokohama. It illustrates two cultures and creates an immersive experience into Japanese culture. JFG’s design is based on centuries-old Japanese techniques adapted to San Diego’s climate and florae and seeks to foster a relationship between humans and nature, providing a respite attuned to Japanese simplicity, serenity, and aestheticism. JFG sits on a 12-acre plot. It offers a variety of educational programs, exhibits, and festivals as well as accredited horticultural classes to enhance and deepen visitor appreciation for Japanese culture. As a valued community resource, it is well known for its unique setting, stone arrangements, koi ponds, water features, sukiya-style buildings and landscape. The Japanese Friendship Garden was first opened in 1991. The second phase, opened in 1999, was designed by renowed landscape architect Takeo Uesugi. This phase added the Exhibit Hall, Activity Center, and Koi Pond. The third phase, completed in 2015, comprised 9 additional acres which included a 200 cherry tree grove, large azalea and camellia garden, a water feature reminiscent of the San Diego watershed, and the state of the art Inamori Pavilion. Today, the Japanese Friendship Garden is visited annually by close to 100,000 people from all over United States and around the world. JFG is our gift to the citizens of San Diego as we continue to provide the community with educational programs to foster better understanding of Japanese culture. We are thankful to the citizens of San Diego who have helped in throughout our development. We feel it is our responsibility to build upon this legacy and continue to promote friendship among diverse cultures. The Japanese Friendship Garden is a member of the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership, a collaboration of 26 arts, science, and culture institutions in Balboa Park. By working together we produce major outcomes that no single organization could achieve alone. Benefits of our Partnership include: Collective cost savings of $800,000 annually Improved organizational performance and creation of new resources (knowledge, innovation, and networks) New financial resources–since 2008 the Partnership has brought $4.2 million in new revenue to Balboa Park Improved public accessibility and safety through capital improvements and ADA upgrades Reduction of Balboa Park’s carbon footprint by 5.4 million kWhs and 91,000 therms annually, the equivalent of 110 homes. Training of more than four thousand Park staff and volunteers to improve professional practice and visitor experience. To learn more about the many ways our collaboration makes the Park a better place to visit, learn, and have fun, please visit the Partnership’s website at www.bpcp.org. LEARN MORE ABOUT THE GARDEN To learn more about the JFG's history, follow these links: 1915 Tea Pavilion


Location & Directions — Japanese Friendship Garden San Diego

Location & DirectionsJapanese Friendship Garden of San Diego Physical Address2215 Pan American Road. E,San Diego, CA 92101 Phone: (619) 232-2721Fax: (619) 232-0917email: jfgsd@niwa.org Mailing Address Driving DirectionsFrom north San Diego via CA-163 South Exit 5 South/Park Blvd Left on Park Blvd Left on Presidents Way Second right into parking lot From north San Diego via I-5 South Exit 10th Street Left on A Street Left on Park Blvd Left on President’s Way Second right into parking lot From south San Diego via I-5 North Exit 6th Street, turn right Right on El Prado Cross the Cabrillo Bridge Drive past the Organ Pavilion and turn left into the parking lot directly behind it. Click here for a full map of Balboa Park and more information on parking locations! Take the Balboa Park TramWe encourage visitors to use the free Balboa Park tram. This free service which will take you from parking lots located at Inspiration Point, behind Spreckels Organ Pavilion, east of the Hall of Champions, or in front of the San Diego Air & Space Museum. To get to the Japanese Friendship Garden, ride the tram to the stop next to the Organ Pavilion. Then walk East past the front of the Organ Pavilion to get to the front entrance of the Garden. The tram runs every eight minutes and travels in a loop through the Park.Click here for more information! Taking Public TransitThe Metropolitan Transit System buses 3, 7, 120, and Rapid 215 serve stops on the East and West sides of Balboa Park. To enter from the Park’s West side, take bus Routes 3 or 120 (which travel on 4th and 5th Avenues) to the stop on Laurel Street, and then walk East on Laurel Street, past 6th Avenue to El Prado which goes over the historic Cabrillo Bridge. Then Make a right and walk South on Pan American Rd E. The Japanese Friendship Garden will be just to the left of the Organ Pavilion. Routes 7 and Rapid 215 operate on Park Boulevard on the Park’s East side and stop both at the stop by the Rose Garden (Route 7) and the San Diego Zoo (Rapid 215 and Route 7). From either stop, cross Park Boulevard and into the Park to El Prado and continue to walk west. Then Make a left and walk South on Pan American Rd E. The Japanese Friendship Garden will be just to the left of the Organ Pavilion. MTS routes to Balboa Park connect with all MTS Trolley Lines and most other MTS Bus and Rapid Routes. In downtown San Diego, Rapid 215 is an easy connection from Amtrak and COASTER trains at the Santa Fe Depot and the Cruise Ship Terminal. For MTS fare and schedule information visit www.sdmts.com.   Banner Photo Credit: Yasuhiro Fujiki


Japanese Friendship Garden (San Jose) - 2019 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

Japanese Friendship Garden (San Jose) - 2019 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)


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Japanese Friendship Dolls of 1927

Japanese Friendship Dolls of 1927


"Miss Okayama," Artist: Koryfisai, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND Photo Dan KoeckOn a Saturday in late November 1927, the children of San Francisco were treated to a doll spectacular unlike any other. Fifty-eight immaculate and exquisitely rendered ichitimatsu-ningyô created by the finest craftsmen in Japan were on display at the Kinmon Gakuen Japanese cultural center on Bush Street. The dolls, each standing nearly 33 inches in height, were attired in classic Japanese fashion with long sleeved silk kimono executed in a myriad of hues with painted designs featuring, among others, bursting chrysanthemums, flowing streams strewn with maple leaves, thatched pavilions nestled amongst blossoming trees, flying birds with fanned tails, and pine trees capped in snow. Their waists were cinched tight with broad silk brocade obi tie belts of equally brilliantly colored silk. Their faces, framed with shocks of jet-black hair in a bang cut, were of a lightly pigmented gofun (shell white) with inset glass eyes all set in an open and innocent expression, gazing out, expectantly, on the assembled audience. Arrayed on the stage in tiered rows, flanked by the flags of Japan and the United States and banners bearing the Japanese imperial crest, these dolls created an unforgettable display of pageantry and beauty. Top: "Miss Saitama," Artist: Koryusai. The Charleston Museum, Charleston, SC. Bottom: "Miss Osaka-fu," Artist: Goyo. Ohio Historical Society, Columbus,OH.These were the now-famous Japanese Friendship Dolls, diplomatic ambassadors of goodwill in doll form, sent as expressions of hope for friendship and goodwill between the children of Japan and the United States. They arrived on the Japanese steamship, the Tenyo Maru, with first class tickets and passports indicating their individual names corresponding to their region of origin: Miss Saitama, Miss Osaka-fu, Miss Taiwan, Miss Japan, etc. They came representing the imperial family, the six principal cities, forty-seven prefectures, and four Japanese overseas territorial holdings. Accompanying each doll was a lacquer trousseau (dôgu) with chests and sewing kits, makeup stands, and mirrors. Parasols and red lacquered sandals, fans and small purses, along with tea sets, lanterns and folding screens made up the rest of their accoutrement. In addition, stands had been created with engraved brass plaques on the front bearing each doll's name in both English and Japanese. This historic display of all fifty-eight at the Kinmon Gakuen on that November day would prove to be the only time they were ever to be displayed together as a complete group. History would not prove kind.


Home

GARDEN HOURS Wed-Sun & Holidays 10AM-5PM Closed Mon-Tue CLARK BONSAI HOURS Located inside the Garden Sat-Sun & Holidays (10AM-4PM)* (*Weather/Air Quality & docent permitting)  GARDEN TOURS Docent Led Tour: Adults: $5/person Children (3 +): $3/person Tours must be requested at least 2 weeks in advance. 10 People Minimum per Tour (Shinzen Gate Entry fees included) School Tours: $3 per student and adult 15 Student Minimum per Tours. Tours must be requested at least 2 weeks in advance. (Shinzen Entry fees included)


Awards Ceremony and Reception for the 2018-2019 Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Literature & the Lindsley and Masao Miyoshi Translation Prize

Awards Ceremony and Reception for the 2018-2019 Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Literature & the Lindsley and Masao Miyoshi Translation Prize


Awards Ceremony and Reception for the 2018-2019 Japan-US Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Literature & the Lindsley and Masao Miyoshi Translation PrizeFriday, March 29 2019, 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM [EST] 1140 Amsterdam Avenue,Columbia University,New York,NY,United States


Japanese Women Seeking Men for Friendship ,Dating & Love

Japanese FriendsMeet people around the world interested in Japanese language and culture. Singles, married, young and young at heart. You could find a new friend, language exchange partner, pen pal, Japan girlfriend or boyfriend, dating partner, lover, wife or husband at Japanesefriends.net. Completely free online dating and personals site.

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