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what is the best asian food

Release time:2019-03-12
15 Best Food in Asia and where to find them

15 Best Food in Asia and where to find them


You love Asian food? So do we. Taste is always subjective. One man’s spicy is another man’s uncontrollable, red faced pain. One woman’s sweet is another woman’s diabetic nightmare. As foodie travellers there is one thing we can promise – We’ve eaten a lot. In doing so, we’ve drawn a bunch of comparisons in order to compile this list. One year in Asia. Its been one hell of a journey, one which still continues. We’ve eaten fantastically well and we’ve discovered foods we’d never even dreamed of. There are a lot of great dishes that did not make the list. So, in no particular order, these are the best of the best foods in Asia and I’m going to tell you why. Xiaolongbao, Shanghai Burning. Explosion. Flavour. Searing. Amazing. That about sums up the consumption timeline of these bite size mouth volcanoes of infinite yum. If you can stand to wait – most can’t – then give them a few minutes to cool down first. We’ve had these in many places across China and other Asian countries. Shanghai is still the best. The Xiaolongbao, or soup dumpling, was featured on an episode of Anthony Bourdain’s “No Reservations”. Unlike the ones he tried, in a fancy restaurant, we ate at a regular hole in the wall sort of place. They were cheap, filling and perfect. Also unlike the giant ones he ate, first supping the juice with a straw, these are of a regular down-in-one size. They may not be the most famous in Shanghai, but you will not be disappointed. Tip: Go for the original pork filling – anything else just isn’t as good. Price: About 12 yuan ($2) for a serve of 12 small dumplingsLocation: JiaJiaTangBao Restaurant, Huanghe Lu, Near Nanjing Xilu, Shanghai. Food MapCan’t make it to Shanghai? Have a crack at making your own dumplings with these awesome Chinese recipes. Easy Chinese Recipes: Family Favorites From Dim Sum to Kung Pao Pork Belly Korean BBQ. Itaewon, SeoulSouth Korea is the most expensive country we visited for food over the last year. Although it is possible to get a meal for under $5 you’ll be stuck with some pretty basic chow. If you want a real taste of Korea then you can’t skip the BBQ. Fortunately, of all the places we tried, one of the best was also one of the best value at 10,000 won ($8.50) for the pork belly set meal. There menu is minimalistic. You either choose the pork belly or the ribs. Although other choices exist, I’m telling you, and so is every other customer in this always busy restaurant, those are the two choices. As with most Korean meals, this one choice is not all you are served. An incredible array of side dishes and condiments will arrive to envelop your table. There are a variety of styles of Korean BBQ. From a basic charcoal grill to a fancy gas hotplate, this place used one of the more modern looking techniques. You get an individual griddle hotplate for your table. It’s on a slant so that the fat runs away from the meat. This style may not be unique in Korea but there was a twist… A selection of shredded veg is placed at the drainage end of the grill. Every delicious drip of pork fat runs through and cooks the veg. Wow. The delicious and crispy pork belly is grilled and then eaten as a lettuce wrap with a mix and match of condiments and sides. Add some of the pork, fatted veg along with salt and the ubiquitous “red sauce” and you are looking at one of the best taste parcels in Korea. Wash it down with a glass of Soju for the authentic experience. Want to enjoy Seoul on a budget? Check out our guide for Seoul on $50 per day for two people. Price: 10,000 Won ($8.50) per person, plus 3,000 won for a small bottle of soju.Location: Its down a side street near directly south behind the Itaewon metro stop. There are loads of restaurants down that street, this one has a pig with its thumb up. Check the food map for precise location.Cook up your own Korean BBQ at home: The Korean Table: From Barbecue to Bibimbap 100 Easy-To-Prepare Recipes   ⇒ Want more info about Seoul? Click Here to check out our Podcast “The Dish” and listen to our full episode about the history of Kimchee and What to Eat in Seoul Ginger/tomato Salad, BurmaWhen referring to Burmese salads, the word “salad” seems like a misnomer. What we are talking about here is a selection of nuts and vegetables covered in oil. It tastes way better than it sounds but you will not be losing any weight. Like any salad, the two main factors are fresh ingredients and an excellent dressing. The recipe for the dressing seemed to be relatively consistent in the many places we tried the various salads – a national Burmese secret perhaps. In any traditional local restaurant, even if not on the menu, just ask for one of the salads and normally they’ll throw one together. The ginger salad is literally chunks of ginger with nuts, crispy fried soya beans and maybe some tomato. The tomato salad is largely tomato and cabbage but also with plenty of nuts etc. too. What is Burmese cuisine? It’s not a nation that has had widespread international recognition. Read more about Burmese cuisine. Price: 300-500 kyat (about 50 cents)Location: All over Burma, especially in Shan State.Explore creating Burmese food for yourself: Burma: Rivers of Flavor Eggplant with minced pork, Hong KongI’ve never been the biggest fan of eggplant. Even in moussaka, which I enjoy, I have to eat it whilst thinking “this doesn’t have eggplant in”, even though I know it does. In Hong Kong I was converted forever. It’s probably because, before the eggplant is added to the mix, it is deep fried. Then it is fried up with minced pork – vegetarian food is not really a thing in China – and a tomato based sauce. It’s another one of those dishes that you just don’t seem to find in a typical Chinese restaurant outside of China/Hong Kong but many restaurants in the Cantonese parts of China have it. Just show them the following text and get ready for a taste bud treat. Price: About 60 $HK (Around $8)Location: Food Map. 5 Fung Cheung Road, Yuen Long. A selection of street restaurants in this area in the evening. On the corner. Jawain Butter Parantha, Amritsar, IndiaThere are only three times of day when Kesar restaurant is quiet, two of those are during the observed temple times, the other is when they are closed. Head in just before 7pm or just before 1pm to ensure you miss the rush. I’ve always thought the French were the kings of bread. Nothing better than a fresh baguette or croissant. I was wrong. Here, in this unassuming dhaba restaurant on a tiny backstreet of Amritsar, we found the lord of baking. For 40 rupees you get the crispiest, most buttery parantha (or “paratha”) bread in India, probably in the world. Just like pizza in Naples, a bread has changed my life and created a need to return to a city that has little else drawing me back. You’ll want something to dip that bread in. We reckon the Palak Paneer (Cheese and spinach curry) is one of the best curries at this place. The “dal fry” is a local favourite though we were not so impressed with it. You may come to Amritsar on a pilgrimage to the Golden temple, heartland of Sikkhism, but you’ll return again for the parantha. Price: 40 rupees (80 cents) for the amazing bread. Curries to accompany start at around 30 rupees for a basic chana (chick pea) or Dal (lentils). We recommend the palak paneer for 100 rupees.Location: Kesar da Dhaba, Amritsar, India. Egg tarts, Hong Kong   Another simple, yet perfect dish – good for breakfast or as a snack. It’s all about the pastry. Although egg tarts are popular throughout China and other parts of the far east, there is a difference. Most of them are made in the Portuguese style, with flaky puff pastry. In Hong kong they are made with sweet, rich and buttery short crust pastry. Sorry Portugal, it’s not just because I’m English, seriously, the egg tarts aren’t as good in the UK either. The Hong kong interpretation of this classic is just better. Price: 2 to 7 $HK each ($0.3 to $1 each)Location: Any bakery, of which there are hundreds. From metro stations to down small residential streets. Cilantro/enoki mushrooms wrapped in tofu/bacon (BBQ), ChinaChinese BBQ. The choices are endless. The availability is country-wide in China. For all the universal options, there was one, well two, BBQ items we just kept coming back to… Coriander (cilantro) leaves or enoki mushrooms wrapped in tofu (or sometimes bacon). The fragrant flavour of the coriander works perfectly with the neutral tasting tofu. It’s one powerful bite of herbal enjoyment. As for the Enoki mushrooms… They are mushrooms. When wrapped in bacon, well… its bacon. Enough said. Aside from the awesomeness of the BBQ items, the whole atmosphere of street BBQ in China keeps you coming back in itself. During summer months little plastic chairs everywhere are packed with people enjoying food, beer and a chat. It’s a massive social event. Price: Prices vary but maybe 2 to 6 yuan per stick of 3 pieces (30 cents to $1)Location: During summer, about 50% of the ever pervasive street side BBQ stalls sell this. Some suggested areas are on the Food map. The Harbin University district was a particular favourite – including 2 liter jugs of draught beer for about 12 yuan ($2) too. This is not the end. Click below to see page 2 of amazing Asian dishes. Some of these International foods might not agree with your stomach – so please be careful and always have travel insurance in case you get sick. We recommend World Nomadsas they’ve always had our back.


Top 50 Foods of Asia: Essential Eating Asian Food Guide

Top 50 Foods of Asia: Essential Eating Asian Food Guide


Travel In AsiaBorneoChina / Hong Kong / MacauCambodiaIndia / Sri Lanka / HimalayasIndonesiaJapanLaosMalaysiaMyanmarPhilippinesSingaporeThailandVietnamGlobal TravelsUK and IrelandWestern EuropeEastern EuropeRest of WorldHotel ListEssential EatingEating in ThailandEating in ChinaEating in MalaysiaEating in MyanmarRum DiariesLife in ThailandEatingExploringCelebrationsHotel EscapesExpat LivingBits ‘n’ BobsAllan and FanfanThailand Travel TalesThe Blogging WorldTravel ResourcesWork with us!Essential Eating: 50 Foods of Asia by Allan WilsonHi, I’m Allan, the grumbly looking fella, eating all sorts of weirdness while wearing traditional Japanese clobber below. That’s also me filling my face with unusual burgers in Xi’an China, and banging some shots of potent moonshine palm toddy in random parts of remote Myanmar. Yet, despite my somewhat miserable demeanor, this is me at my happiest. Eating and drinking weird stuff, in weird places, surrounded by weirdness. And I have been doing very similar for the past 5 years or so, while farting about in Asia, and just skiving really. It’s been great. Anyway, while I would love to share everything tgat has been forced through my piehole in the past 5 years, I don’t think I have time to. So instead I will just share my Top 50 Foods of Asia. The Must-Eats that every person should try when travelling in these parts of the world. And if you missed any on past visits then you have to go back. Note, I know this is a longer post than my usual, so I’ve added in a fancy looking eBook over there <<< on the right-hand sidebar <<<. And this will also give access to all my free eBooks and guides which, of course, are all awesome. 01. CHILLI CRAB in SingaporeStir-fried crab in a tomato based, sweet, savoury and slightly hot chilli sauce. Break into its claws with crab crackers and suck at the flesh. The popular crab choice in Singapore is the mud crab but expect all sorts of shapes and sizes. While having lost its lustre of late the chilli Crab will always be a must-eat when in Singapore. Red Chilli Crab in Singapore’s Chinatown02. KHANTOKE DINNER in ThailandA traditional Northern Thai feast showcasing many of the region’s Lanna food favourites. Bites include chilli dips, spicy sausage, Northern style curries and the staple rice. “Khantoke” refers to the haunch height, round tables in which diners feast around and dinners generally come with traditional dance, performances and local liquor. Khantoke Dinner Feast in Chiang Rai Thailand03. CURRY FEAST in Sri LankaLaced with chunks of cinnamon, curry leaves and other local spices, a curry feast on the Island of Spice is not to be missed. In Sri Lanka curries rarely come served alone and are often matched with sides (condiments) of bean curry, cabbage curry, dhal curry… all sorts of curry. Eat with rice, spicy sambals and popadoms. Curries to Serve with Sides and Condiements04. MOMOS in the HimalayasWith obvious Chinese influences these Himalayan meat and/or veg dumplings make a great fast food snack to-go. While best known for Nepali origins momos are now common on all sides of Himalayan borders through Tibet, Bhutan and India. Momos are served with an optional hot chilli sauce, dark soy and a side of soup. Steam Cooked Momos in Sikkim, India05. CANDIED HAWS in ChinaLike mini candy apples with a sharp sour bite. Candied haws known locally as Bing Tanghulu are a popular street food snack made from local Chinese Hawthorns skewered, dipped in sugar syrup and left to harden. While haws are the most common sweet, there are variations with deseeded and stuffed haws or varying candied fruits. Candied Chinese Hawthorns in Beijing06. KIMCHI in KoreaAccompanying almost every Korean meal these spicy, fermented vegetables are like the ketchup of Korea. While the most common Kimchi is of pickled napa cabbage (baechu kimchi) there is in fact seemingly endless variations of vegetables and seasonings. To make a meal of it try Kimchi fried rice (Kimchi Bokumbap). Korean banchan sides of Kimchi07. SATAY (SATE) in IndonesiaQuintessential barbecue food with tender meat pieces, marinated, skewered and grilled over flaming hot charcoals. Satay comes served with a fiery, hot peanut sauce and while replicated elsewhere in Asia regional interpretations can be less spicy and more sweet. Satay is no doubt found best at its origins in Java Indonesia. Sate Skewers with Hot Spicy Indonesian Sauce08. ROTI PRATA in SingaporeBetter known for origins in India this humble pan-fried flatbread followed old colonial trade routes to Singapore, my new favourite city to share this simple food staple. Roti Prata is found best at Indian Muslim shop house restaurants in Singapore, try Little India or Geylang. Best served with curry sides and Tiger Beer. Folded Roti Served with Curries and Dips09. AIS KACANG in MalaysiaShaved ice is common with Asian desserts but for me it is best found in Malaysia with AIS Kacang, a mix of shaved ice and variations of fruit, beans, icecreams and syrups. Ingredients do vary but the traditional mix comes with red beans, sweet corn, grass jelly and cubes of agar jelly. Also popular in Singapore and Brunei. Ais Kacang. Malaysia’s Famous Shaved Ice Desser10. NOODLE SOUPS in ChinaI find an exciting new world of noodle soups in China with meaty toppings and fascinating local flavours. Some of the more memorable bowls include toppings of sausage or even chicken drumsticks and flavourings of pickled long-bean and mouth numbing Sichuan peppercorns. Variations can be endless. Experimenting with Noodles in Wulong China11. SHAN NOODLES in MyanmarThis popular street food and tea house snack is served as thin rice noodles, topped with spiced meat and, more than not, with the soup broth on the side. Mix together and slurp it up. Popular sides include bean sprouts, deep-fried pork skins and triangles of tofu fritters (napyan gyaw). Perfected with chilli and lime. Shan Noodle in a Shop House of Mandalay12. BEEF RENDANG in IndonesiaBeef stewed in coconut milk with a spice paste mix of ginger, turmeric and fiery chillies. With slow cooking times and impatient waits I find beef dishes to be out of favour in Asia. Beef Rendang makes up for this and following hours of perfecting, the resulting Rendang is a dry, rich and caramelised beef masterpiece. Dry Beef Rendang in Bali, Indonesia13. DIM SUM in Hong KongBite-sized dumplings, steam cooked and served as either an appetizer or together as a feast. Dim Sum dumplings come with various flavours and fillings and are traditionally served in bamboo steaming baskets. In Hong Kong ‘Yum Cha’ is an eating experience hard to beat where Dim Sum joins local tea tasting. Steaming Trays of Delicious Dim Sum14. SUSHI in JapanSushi is ‘cooked vinegared rice, topped with ingredients’. Some of the popular ingredients in the bright and beautiful world of sushi includes thin cuts of fresh fish, caviar and fish eggs and wraps of seaweed. If the delicate tastes of sushi fail to excite then dabs of soy sauce, wasabi or pickled ginger will liven it up. Sushi Set in a Japanese Izakaya, Sendai Japan15. FISH HEAD CURRY in SingaporeA uniquely Singapore dish reflecting both Indian and Chinese cultures of this food-obsessed city. A hot South-Indian style curry brought together with the Chinese obsession for red snapper fish head. The result is curry perfection. If the full curry is too filling, smaller offerings can be found at Singapore’s precooked hawker stalls. Fiery Fish Head Curry in Little India, Singapore16. BEERLAO in LaosOften better known from logoed backpacker t-shirts this iconic Beer brand is one of the most sought after beers in Southeast Asia and with 99% share of Laos’ beer market it can often be hard to see past. If bored of the regular Beerlao try the Beerlao Black or Gold alternatives. Perfect with sunsets on the Mekong River. Beering by the Mekhong in Savannakhet Laos17. NASI CAMPUR in MalaysiaCanteen style curry buffets serving hot pre-cooked dishes and other sides. Grab a plate, pile on the rice and take your pick. Nasi Campur (mixed rice) canteens can offer 10s to 100s of curry options and work well as an introduction to Malaysia’s eating. In North Malaysia Nasi Kandar is a similar, more Indian inspired alternative. Going to Town at a Nasi Kandar in North Malaysia18. BULGOGI BBQ in KoreaKorean Barbecues are hands-on eating where diners cook their own meats over built-in charcoal grills at restaurant tables. Eat with a hot chilli dipping sauce (ssamjang) and share with Kimchis and other popular Korean side dishes (banchan). The big favourite at Korean barbecues is bulgogi, a rich marinated beef. Table Top Barbecue with Meat Set and Dips19. BUN CHA in VietnamFatty grilled pork (Cha) served with rice noodles (Bun), fresh picks of herbs and a salty, sweet and slightly hot dipping sauce (nuoc cham). This popular Hanoian dish offers an unhealthy escape from the green and goodness of Vietnamese cuisine. It is also a ‘lunch-time’ food and is best found around midday. Bun Cha with Nuoc Cham in Hanoi Vietnam20. EGG TARTS in MacauThe signature Macau egg tart comes with a crisp and flaky pastry, a caramelized sugar top, and a smooth, creamy egg custard centre. While many foods in Macau are Chinese influenced the egg tart originates from the Portuguese Colonial era. To this date it is the best known, and easiest to find ‘Macanese’ treat. Eat warm. The Fantastic Fanfan in Macau21. BEEF NOODLES in TaiwanSlow stewed beef, simmered in beef broth and served with Chinese noodles and happy additions of greens. This rich and hearty noodle dish is common to Taiwan’s famous night markets and with its revered reputation in Taipei it has been celebrated annually with its own Festival (Taipei Beef Noodles Festival). Chewy Beef Noodle Soup in Ximending22. MANGO STICKY RICE in ThailandThe best known of Thai desserts and one to make up for the Kingdom’s lack of choice. While fresh mango alone is delicious enough; when matched with coconut sticky rice, drizzles of coconut syrup and sprinkles of toasted mung beans this sweet treat is unstoppable. Sweet, slightly salty and all round delicious. Mango Sticky Rice in Bangkok Food Courts23. BREAKFAST CREPES in ChinaChinese food isn’t all stir-fries and rice dishes and this is illustrated best through street food where flatbreads and grilled meats are more the staple. My favourite street snack has to be Jianbing a thin egg crepe with scatters of scallions, a smudge of rich chilli sauce, lettuce leaf filling and a crunchy centre of crisp fried dough. Early Morning Crepe at Xian’s Street Food24. BURYANI in Sri LankaWhile Biryani is common to much of South Asia in Sri Lanka it comes hotter, spicier and ultimately better. For those new to Biryani (known as Buryani in Sri Lanka) it is a layered rice dish which fuses an aromatic and flavoursome sauce of local spices. While Buryani can be a meal to itself it does match well with tandoori chicken. Biryani on a Stopover in Negombo Sri Lanka25. MASSAMAN CURRY in ThailandGreen, Red, Yellow… should all bow to Massaman, the King of Curries. This revered Thai curry comes best slow cooked with beef and potatoes and topped with pan-fried peanuts before serving. While uniquely Thai the Massaman does have a South Asian kick with occasional spices of cardamom, cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. A fancy version of Massaman Curry in Bangkok26. DURIAN in Southeast AsiaIn South East Asia the Durian is both feared and revered as the formidable ‘King of Fruits’. For those who brave past the alien-esque shell and pungent smell, expect a lifelong obsession for the sweet, creamy and perfect fruit inside. The Durian is a seasonal fruit with harvests best found between June and October. Up Close with a Durian in Isaan Thailand27. BICOL EXPRESS in the PhilippinesThis fiery stewed pork dish is flavoured with garlic, chili, ginger and shrimp paste before simmering to perfection in coconut milk. As a sucker for coconut and chili kicks the Bicol Express is a personal favourite for the Philippines as few dishes come close on chilli heat. Bicol Express is rumoured to be even hotter at its origins of Bicol. A Fiery Bicol Express in Puerto Princesa, Philippines28. GULAB JAMUN in IndiaGulab Jamun are spongy dough-like dumplings made from the deep frying of curdled milk solids and flavourings of cardamom and a rosewater sugar syrup. A favourite dessert throughout the South Asian subcontinent Gulab Jamun are sweet, sugary and undeniably delicious. Serve either hot or cold. A Sweet, Sexy Gulab Jamun. Room Service in Kolkata.29. CURRY FEAST in MyanmarEating in Myanmar can be intimidating with a somewhat rough and ready reputation. A good start is no doubt at the local curry canteens where choice of meat comes with a mix of sides. Expect maybe a veg soup, a watercress salad, tomato curry and my personal favourite bean curry. Eat with rice, veg and fish paste (ngapi). The Traditional Burmese Curry Fare in Yangon30. PHO in VietnamPronounced ‘Fu’ as in ‘Furby’ Pho is an aromatic, broth-based noodle soup full of healthy herbs and local spice. It is also hard to miss in Vietnam being found all day, every day, everywhere. Note don’t let soup exploration end here, Vietnam must be the soup mecca of the world with seemingly endless soup bowls to slurp on. Phenomenal Pho in Ho Chi Minh City31. BEIJING DUCK in ChinaKnown globally as ‘Peking Duck’ the perfect oven roast duck comes served with thin crisp skin and moist tender meat. Eat wrapped in pancakes with the cool crunch of cucumber, a bite of scallions and a rich swab of hoisin sauce. It is fair to say ‘the best Beijing Duck can be found in Beijing’ and I find it hard to disagree. Beijing Duck at the famous Dadong Restaurant in Beijing.32. SUMMER ROLLS in VietnamFresh local herbs, vermicelli (rice) noodles, and choice of meat (fresh prawns please) all tightly wrapped in rice paper. Fresh spring rolls, or summer rolls, are easily my favourite snack option in Vietnam and come perfectly matched with a rich peanut sauce (Nuoc Leo). How something so green and healthy tastes this good is beyond me. Fresh Spring (summer) Rolls in Ho Chi Minh Vietnam33. RAMEN NOODLES in JapanNoodles are a staple in Japanese eating and for the best of them it is hard to look past Ramen. As with most noodle bowls Ramen come in three parts; the noodles, the broth and the meaty topping. The popular Ramen bowl would be with a thick pork bone soup (tonkotsu) and toppings of braised pork belly (chashumen). Oishii Oishii! Ramen, Beer and Gyoza Under the Shimbashi Station, Tokyo34. DUM ALOO in the Himalayan RegionGolden fried potatoes, sautéed onions cooked in a perfectly spiced tomato gravy. While often mistaken as a Nepali dish, the origins of Dum Aloo trace back to the Kashmiri region of India. Now it has been adopted by restaurants throughout the Himalayan ranges; Nepal, Tibet and even Bhutan. My favourite vegetarian dish. Spicy Dum Aloo in the Indian Himalayas35. FRUIT RUJAK in IndonesiaRujak mixes the sweets and sours of regional fruits with the spicy and hot of a rich chilli and tamarind fused dressing. While fruits will vary through regions and seasons the common bites include water apple, pineapple and sour unripe mangoes. Rujak or Rojak is also common to Singapore and Malaysia. Sweets and Sours with a Side of Chilli36. SUCKLING PIG in IndonesiaIn this world few things beat roast pig, and few roast pigs can compete with that of Bali, Indonesia. Cooked whole hog on a spit roast the resulting meat comes tender, and the skin thin and crisp. The dish can only be perfected by the quintessential spice mix. Suckling pig is a popular breakfast bite but can be found day round. Suckling Pig at Ibu Oka in Ubud, Bali.37. LAO BAGUETTES in LaosColonial French influences don’t come more obvious? While fillings are potentially limitless with this street food staple, the popular Lao baguette comes with pork liver pate, steamed pork (moo yor), shreds of carrot and radish and cuts of cucumber. Perfect with a squeeze of mayo and swab of fiery chilli sauce. A lovely baguette38. TAKOYAKI in JapanSavoury octopus dough balls filled with tempura scraps and flavourings of spring onions and pickled ginger. Serve in a ‘boat’ and top with mayonnaise and a soy-like sauce (often compared to Worcester sauce). While popular as a side dish on restaurant menus Takoyaki are found best piping hot from street food, still gooey. They are one of the most common street food snacks in Japan. Takoyaki at its Origins in Osaka Japan39. THALI PLATES in IndiaProviding an easy introduction to Indian food is the Thali plate a set meal of pretty much anything. Each Thali comes served with various dishes which often include flatbreads, grilled meats, flavoured rices and selections of meat and veg curries. Eat with sides of chutneys, pickles, spiced dips and popadoms. Thali Plate of Biryani, Chicken Tandoori, Popadoms and Curries40. SICHUAN HOT POT in ChinaWith extreme heat of chillies and the numb of Sichuan peppercorns the Hot Pot experience hits like a punch in the face.. and it’s a punch you’ll keep coming back for. Hot Pots are hands-on eating where diners cook their own meats in built-in soup pots at restaurant tables. Eat as a soup and share with various condiments. The Cygnet Brand Hot Pot at it’s Origins of Chongqing41. AMOK in CambodiaWhile various meats can be used in preparation the fish amok (amok trey) is no doubt the local favourite in Cambodia. Steamed in banana leaves fresh fish is fused with thick coconut cream and a fiery khmer curry paste to create a simple snack with a somewhat mousselike texture. Best described as “steamed curry fish”. A painting of fiery red deliciousness42. CHICKEN RICE in SingaporeOne of Singapore’s most common and sought after hawker foods is Hainanese Chicken rice where a whole chicken is cooked by boiling and served over rice cooked in chicken stock. Chicken perfection is said to have oily skin, tender meat and an all-important gelatin layer between. Add optional drizzles of dark soy or chilli. In Search of the Perfect Hainanese Chicken43. CURRY in JapanThis unlikely Japanese staple can be best found in Katsu Curry served with a pork cutlet and garnishings of red pickled daikon. But curry in no means ends here as I find many weird and wonderful combinations on offer. My favourite to date (pictured) served over a beef burger with a crisp mozzarrela topping. Curry over Beef burger topped with crisp Mozzarrela. Slobtastic.44. TANDOORI CHICKEN in IndiaChicken pieces are first marinated in spices and left overnight to soak in the flavour. The next day the chicken is skewered and cooked wihin a giant earthenware oven. On goes the lid and the chicken is smoked to perfection. Tender on the inside, crisp and flavoursome on the out. The tandoor oven was no doubt a blessing from Vishnu. Chicken Cooked in an Earthenware Tandoor Oven.45. KHAO SOI CURRY in ThailandIf Massaman is the King of Curries then Khao Soi is King of the North. Presiding in Northern Thailand Khao Soi is a coconut based curry, well spiced and comes served over soft egg noodles, topped with crisp egg noodles. Flavour with lime, onion, chilli and pickled cabbage. While relatively mild in heat it is no doubt full in flavour. Khao Soi, King of the North, in Chiang Rai Thailand46. LAAB MOO SALAD in LaosA fiery minced pork salad stir-fried with shallots, coriander and mint leaves and plenty of chilli heat. While famous in Thailand’s Northeast Region (Isaan) this much-loved salad originated in Laos where it comes well matched with the Lao staple of sticky rice. A chewy alternative is ‘Nam Tok Moo’ with grilled pieces of pork. Laab by the Mekhong in Savannakhet47. CURRY MEE in MalaysiaThis spicy, coconut-based curry soup comes served over egg noodles, with fried tofu, crunchy additions of beansprouts and occasional cubes of congealed pigs blood. Curry Mee is my preferred eggy alternative to the better known ‘Curry Laksa’, the difference being ‘Mee’ are egg noodles while laksa are thick rice noodles. Curry Mee Penang, Top 50 Foods of Asia, Asian Food Guide48. ADOBO in the PhillippinesAdobo is the unofficial National Dish of the Philippines and with origins in the Spanish colonial era Adobo translates to ‘Marinade’ from Spanish. This marinated meat dish comes with flavourings of local palm vinegar (suka), garlic, black pepper and soy sauce. Comes best slow cooked with chicken or pork or both (CPA). CPA Chicken and Pork Adobo in Manila49. SAKE in JapanSake is in fact a generic term which means no more than ‘alcohol’ in Japan. The Sake many of us know is in fact ‘Nihonshu’ a Japanese rice wine with standard strength of around 14% or so. If you want a tipple with more of a kick try Shochu (25%-ish). While Sake comes best chilled it is often served heated in Japan’s colder months. Sake with Snacks at a Japanese Izakaya50. LOCAL LIQUORS everywhereThere are few quicker routes to local immersion than boozing with locals, and the harder the liquor, the quicker you get there. Many moonshine liquors are made through the fermentation and distillation of local staples and common examples include rice husks for rice whiskys or palm sap for palm wines. Bottoms up. Liquoring with Locals in Satun ThailandFree eBook: 50 Top Foods of AsiaFor this post in eBook format, and for access to all our other eBooks, sign-up below. All awesome and no junk. Email address: Leave this field empty if you're human:   Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)MoreClick to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Related 88 Comments Sofia Duncansays: May 22, 2015 at 9:54 amI think I haven’t tasted half of these beautifully photographed wonders of Asian foodlandia, but the curries and noodles and chickens surely are my top favorites.. and that fancy dessert in Malaysia with ice cream on the top makes me drool and come back and hunt for it! I love your list! Reply Allan Wilsonsays: May 22, 2015 at 10:14 amHard to beat a good curry. Tempted to make this list 100. Just too much to share Reply Bryan shah says: May 17, 2018 at 9:56 pmWhat the fuck? Why indonesia claim malaysian food? Rojak buah..satay rendang..is malaysian food..who the hell is make this blog? Reply Allan Wilsonsays: May 17, 2018 at 11:03 pmCalm yourself Bryan. There’s a lot of crossover in Malay/indonesian cuisines. Although wiki shows rendang as: Origins: Indonesia, West Sumatra and Satay as Origin: Indonesia, then Rojak as Origins: Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore Kudos with the nationalism tho. Patriotism should always come before being agressively wrong. Actually I think I remember Malaysia claiming Fish Head Curry at one point as well. Reply Ma says: December 4, 2018 at 1:02 amit says Rujak not Rojak, rujak has alot of variety (serut, cingur, buah, lotis and many others). then Rendang see also semur daging, dendeng sapi, rendang, empal gepuk, thats all the chain and variety of indonesian style beef cooking ( from wet stew till dried jerk). Dedicated to Briyan. Who is claiming? Reply Fibz Eng says: August 8, 2018 at 9:17 pmI really think Malaysia has more good food than Singapore … Cheers!!!! Reply Sarah says: September 26, 2018 at 12:19 amAwesome blog.. Good and thanks for sharing with us.. mind blowing post… superb Reply Tristan says: January 9, 2019 at 4:11 ami didnt know half those foods ReplyLeave a Reply Cancel replyFree Cancellation Bookings Booking.comGet Your Guide in Asia Free eBook Subscription Email address: Leave this field empty if you're human: Fanfan on Instagram :)Load More…Follow on Instagram


The top 10 countries for Asian food

Share on Google PlusWhich Asian cuisine reigns supreme? It's an almost impossible task to separate them. It's like choosing your favourite child – although it's actually far more difficult than that, because there's no innately right answer. How do you decide which Asian nation produces the best cuisine? How do you weigh up the ramen of Japan against the hand-pulled noodles of China? How do you compare a Thai curry to a Sri Lankan masala? How do you place a Malaysian nasi lemak against a Vietnamese com tam? The answer, of course, is that you can't. Not really, anyway. This is all subjective, it's wild opinion. Any other day I could come up with a completely different list and still be confident that it was correct. There's almost no bad food in Asia, there's no terrible place to eat (except maybe Mongolia – sorry guys). You're just separating these places in terms of relative greatness. So here is the definitely-not-definitive list: Asia's finest cuisines, rated and ranked. Any foodie worth their Himalayan rock salt will undoubtedly disagree. (NB: There's a notable omission on this list: Singapore. And I hear you, the food there is mind-blowingly good. However, a lot of that cuisine is other people's: it's Chinese, Indian, Malay and European. For that reason I've had to miss it out. Let's say it came 11th.) 10. South KoreaIce cream in Seoul" src="http://www.smh.com.au/content/dam/images/h/0/w/p/n/u/image.imgtype.articleLeadwide.620x349.png/1519697446464.png" title="" width="100%"<Ice-cream in Seoul. Photo: Alamy There's far more to South Korean food than barbecue – though that's a cherished part of it. However, you can't miss chimaek, the beautiful combination of Korean-style fried chicken and beer, plus kongnamulguk, a warming bean-sprout soup, bulgogi, marinated grilled meat, bibimbap, a type of fried rice, and anything with kimchi. You will now receive updates fromTraveller Newsletter


What is the best Asian cuisine?

What is the best Asian cuisine?


FoodWhat is the best Asian cuisine?UpdateCancelaDudM TACdbKfBMKyZI qPWbVBetbAqksXZSctjwYaQEVIujrBqaCaxuxnItFtFSZWtUxoZrceD Do you own or manage a restaurant?We carry everything you could need including refrigeration, disposables, furniture, consumables & more!SLFCGhDBoWpJzJi DeKsuNApnoBjqDwwK loaYMaGXtWBaa sHKEwuhXeuNtRMbTJXGcsLxWLtRXCCaCKBNucGuqrCrmtnacpxZnOXtYwKnsSytLthGomWxrGnPmeK.kcmozBliZmQknNGYou dismissed this ad.The feedback you provide will help us show you more relevant content in the future.UndoAnswer Wiki8 AnswersTiffany ChengUpdated 21w ago· Author has 944 answers and 2.2m answer viewsMany Asian countries have great cuisines that I enjoy and appreciate, but Chinese cuisine will always be the best to me because its sheer variety and its significant influence on the other Asian cuisines. So in my mind, Chinese food is like The Beatles of Asian cuisine. Chinese cuisine to me is like The Beatles of Asian cuisine because for these reasons: The Beatles is the most influential rock musical artist alongside with Elvis, Chinese cuisine is the most influential Asian cuisine alongside with Indian cuisine.The Beatles throught its career innovated a lot in terms of rock music, Chinese cuisine innovated a lot throught the history of China.The Beatles adopted influences from the other musical artists to enrich its musical repertoire, Chinese cuisine adopted influences from the other cuisines to enrich its culinary repertoire.Within The Beatles you have John Lennon style Beatles songs, Paul McCartney style Beatles songs, George Harrison style Beatles songs, and you even have few Ringo Starr style Beatles songs. Within Chinese cuisine you have Cantonese style Chinese food, Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food, Hokkien/Fujian style Chinese food, Hakka style Chinese food, Sichuan style Chinese food, Hunan style Chinese food, Shanghai style Chinese food, and so on.Numerous rock bands adopted The Beatles musical techniques and sounds, numerous other Asian cuisines adopted Chinese cooking techniques and ingredients.Sorry for my ramblings, I don't mean to put the other Asian cuisines down because other Asian cuisines are all great in their own ways, I am just stating the reasons of why I love Chinese cuisine. Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food and Cantonese style Chinese food top my choice the most. The reason why I put Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food and Cantonese style Chinese food on the top is because I find these two styles of Chinese food stand out as being the most impressive. Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food is impressive because many of Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food dishes are healthy and clean yet delicious on the same because cleanness and freshness of the ingredients are the main focus on Teochew/Chaozhou cooking. Teochew/Chaozhou style Chinese food might be plainer and simpler in flavour than Cantonese or other styles of Chinese food but still pretty delicious overall. Cantonese style Chinese food is impressive because the Cantonese are blessed with great talent of making new varied dishes that make people always interested, which is the reason why Cantonese style Chinese food has impressive amount of variety within the dishes. As well, the sophistication and the elaborative style of Cantonese cooking is pretty mind blowing, the Cantonese could even rival the French on showing culinary prowess if I dare to say. Sichuan and Hunan styles Chinese food are also great, but they are spicier and not quite healthy. Central and Western styles Chinese food are interesting because of the influences from the merchants of other places (especially Arabs and Central Arabs) that came to China through the Silk Road during ancient period. Shanghai style Chinese food and other Eastern styles Chinese food has lots of interesting soup dumplings and famous for red cooking. I grew to like Hokkien/Fujian style Chinese food now because I find there are some recipes of Hokkien/Fujian dishes that Infind interesting, especially the seafood recipes. Hakka food is simple and robust, yet delicious on the same time. Northeastern style Chinese food is kind of lackluster compared to the other styles of Chinese food. Shandong style Chinese food is the best Northern style Chinese food because the flavour is lighter and less greasy than the other Northern styles of Chinese food. 978 Views · View 2 UpvoterssefHmrpsoIYBFnYsnaXWHoESPCmrGOaenInxdwQToq TvHVbgROHoyskx PnINmVLjyYpceJeEMriwiKsfEeycrtaM SyCrZPwuSKxrWOqYLoRlzNdifaguHVFfCcJWRffeu 8 pounds of produce for $11 — delivered to your door.Our fruits and vegetables may look funny. But they taste amazing and cost less than produce in stores.SKhHwAohQpFK dllzNHjPobGIwE aaAtxt CgsiLMxmHBpYhqXeSzRprNfrhYedcNWZyOtZLMDUpQEvnrKpvoHdgCuBvLIcPNUelbmS.vcDdNYpoiZsdmUYou dismissed this ad.The feedback you provide will help us show you more relevant content in the future.UndoRelated QuestionsMore Answers BelowWhy are Asian cuisines so successful?What is the difference between Asian and other cuisines?What are some of the best South East Asian cuisine?Why is African cuisine not as popular in the West as Asian cuisine?Who likes Asian cuisines?View moreRelated QuestionsWhat are the best cuisines in the world and why?What is pan-Asian cuisine?What is the best spicy Indian cuisine?What is the best Japanese cuisine dish?Why is there no cheese in Asian cuisine?What is the best cuisine?What asian cuisine has healthier food?What Asian country makes the best dessert?What is the best French-cuisine recipe?What is the most unique food in Asian cuisine?Which is the most popular cuisine in the world?What Asian country has the best food?What is the best of Bengali cuisine?What is your favourite kind of Asian cuisine?What is the best fish cuisine?Related QuestionsWhy are Asian cuisines so successful?What is the difference between Asian and other cuisines?What are some of the best South East Asian cuisine?Why is African cuisine not as popular in the West as Asian cuisine?Who likes Asian cuisines?What are the best cuisines in the world and why?What is pan-Asian cuisine?What is the best spicy Indian cuisine?What is the best Japanese cuisine dish?Why is there no cheese in Asian cuisine?


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Top 10 Asian Foods (Delicious Eats)

Published on Apr 12, 2018Anyone else out there a foodie? If so, then you already know that Asia offers the tastiest dishes on our planet! I've spent the large majority of the last 5 years living and traveling throughout Asia, and the food there is as good as it gets. In this video, find out my top 10 favorite Asian dishes. FYI - it was really REALLY hard to narrow down this list. There are about 10 more dishes that almost made the cut.. but I'll save that for a follow up video shortly :) What's your favorite Asian dish?! Let me know in the comments below -- I'm curious to see if you guys agree with my top choices. Music: Epidemic Sound ► Subscribe for more travel videos: http://bit.ly/2hyQnZ1 ► Travel Blog: https://drewbinsky.com/ FIND ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drewbinsky/(I post daily videos there!) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drewbinsky/ Snapchat @drewbinsky Twitter: https://twitter.com/drewbinsky MORE ABOUT ME: https://drewbinsky.com/about/ CONTACT ME: drew (at) drewbinsky (dot) com Category


10 Reasons Why Asian Food Is The Best

10 Reasons Why Asian Food Is The Best


Asian food is notorious for ruining everything good and easy in your life. After one bite, you’ll soon realise that all other dishes are bland and stodgy in comparison, and you’ll have to hunt and gather for ace Asian restaurants for the rest of your days. Asian food is the best food out of all the nationalities. It’s quite a statement, but it’s one that I stand by! Sure, I might be a touch biased since I am half Asian, but I prefer to call myself ‘well-educated’ instead of biased.


11 Best Asian Recipes | Easy Asian Recipes | Quick ... - NDTV ...

11 Best Asian Recipes | Easy Asian Recipes | Quick ... - NDTV ...


TwitterInstagramLists11 Best Asian Recipes | Easy Asian Recipes | Quick Asian Recipes11 Best Asian Recipes | Easy Asian Recipes | Quick Asian RecipesAashna Ahuja , NDTV  |  Updated: January 09, 2019 16:52 IST TweeterfacebookRedditAsian Recipes: If Pan-Asian is your favourite cuisine and you are out looking for some inspiration to cook up a storm at home, then you've come to the right place. Explore the diverse cuisines of Asia, all synonymous with remarkable flavours and vibrant colours. Ingredients common to many cultures of the regions include rice, ginger, garlic, sesame seeds, chillies and soy; while stir frying, steaming and deep frying are the most common cooking methods employed to make delectable dishes. And the rich curries that make pan-Asian cuisine such a rage across the globe are cooked with coconut milk that works brilliantly to accentuate the flavours. (Also Read: Indian Chinese Move Over, the Pan Asian Food Trend is Here to Stay) When it comes to Japanese cuisine, there's much more on offer than sushi. Right from crispy tempuras to silken tofu, there are many contrasting textures at play that help you enjoy the light, simple flavours and make the experience more exciting. (Also Read: A Beginner's Guide to Eating Sushi) Did you know: rice plays an important role in Pan-Asian cuisine? In Japan, apart from sushi, it is also used to make a popular alcoholic beverage called sake. In Korean and Thai cuisines, rice is the backbone of almost every meal. (Also Read: 4 Tips to Keep In Mind If You're Ordering Sushi for the First Time) Does Korean cuisine start and end at kimchi for you? While it forms an integral part of their meals, Korean food is also about artful presentation combined with bold and fiery flavours. It is about spices, seafood and side dishes (banchan). The most common spices used by the Koreans are sesame oil, chilli pepper paste, soy sauce and scallions. Coming to Chinese food, which is probably the most loved in the Pan Asian food category, the cuisine offers an intelligent blend of flavours in their numerous preparations. From sizzling sea bass to simple stir-fries, make your own version at home. If you're looking for low-calorie cooking, then the process of steaming is just the ticket for you. Chinese food actually varies tremendously region by region- Sichuan cuisine is spicy, Shangdong is generally tangy and crispy, and Cantonese cuisine is sweet. Whether you're craving kung pao chicken or delicious dumplings, try your hand at rustling them up at home. Thai cuisine is all about balancing bold flavours: think creamy curries and exotic notes brought about by blending fragrant lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, galangal, fish sauce and shallots. From simple Som Tum papaya salad to Pad Thai, every dish is a gastronomic delight. Malay and Indonesian cuisines too have their culinary foundations based on the art of balancing flavours. How can you forget Nasi Goreng, soul nourishing Laksa, Rendang and the like? And it isn't difficult to replicate these recipes in your own kitchen these days, thanks to the many specialty stores that have made these ingredients readily available. Of the lesser known cuisines, there is Vietnamese which screams simplicity, where local seasonal produce are cooked in flavourful stocks. Pho, a noodle soup, is the most popular pick across the globe, followed by the rice paper rolls. Cambodian cuisine on the other hand is very similar to Thai cuisine, highlighting bold flavours and rich curries made with coconut milk. Amok is one of their most loved dishes, which is a delicious curry made either with fish or chicken. Cambodians are also known for their whole fish preparations such as sizzling red snapper curry made with pineapples. So go on, and cook up a storm in your kitchen and get the best of Asian cuisine with our 10 best recipes. Here are 11 Best Asian Recipes You Must Try At Home  1. Asian BBQ ChickenFire up your grill! Marinated in char siu and flavored with honey, spruce up our slightly sweet yet tangy recipe with some fried rice.   2. Vietnamese DumplingsEasy-to-follow and just delectable, make these steamed dumplings stuffed with minced pork and mushrooms. Team them with spicy chilly garlic sauce and enjoy.    (Also Read: 10 Best Chinese Chicken Recipes) 3. Burmese Khao Suey Garnish this one-pot meal with fried garlic, onion, peanuts, the works! And with a generous squeeze of lime, you'll have this Burmese delicacy bursting with authentic flavors in no time.   (Also Read:10 Best Dumpling Recipes) 4. Grilled Fish with South-East Asian Dressing Grilled to perfection and made with sesame oil, serve these melt-in-your-mouth fish fillets with a tangy dressing, this fish preparation is every fish lover's delight.  5. Chilli Chicken Indo-Chinese and just divine, skip the take-out and savour this boneless chilli chicken in the comfort of your home. Team it with fried rice or just have it stand-alone, this spicy and delectable dish is a show-stealer.  6. Thai Fish Curry Impress your guests no end with this ambrosial Thai green curry, cooked with coconut and tenderly cooked fish. Spicy, easy and nothing short of spectacular! 7. Diced Chicken in Black Bean Sauce Chicken lovers, raise your hand! A favourite of many, this chicken dish is cooked with peppers and loaded with chilli. Serve on a bed of egg fried rice or noodles, and you're good to go. 8. Japanese Prawn Tempura Crispy, crunchy and just perfect- This prawn tempura can get any party started! Serve with soya sauce and be the star of the evening.  9. Asian Sesame Chicken Salad Simply scrumptious and topped with almonds, healthy and heavenly - this chicken salad is your new favourite. Chicken is counted among the best sources of lean protein. Protein helps induce the feeling of satiety, which further prevents you from bingeing. This eventually helps facilitate weight loss.  10. Hazelnut Asian Lettuce Wrap Wrapped in Romaine lettuce and spruced up with coleslaw, you just can't get enough of this zesty chicken recipe. 11. Stir Fried Udon Noodle With Black Peeper Sauce CommentsUdon is thick wheat flour noodle used extensively in Japanese cuisine. This flavoursome preparation is made in a delectable black pepper sauce and also packs the fresh goodness of bell peppers, mock duck and a host of other toothsome ingredients. Wholesome and delicious, this is a perfect recipe for a cozy dinner party Udon is thick wheat flour noodle used extensively in Japanese cuisineTry these delicious Asian recipes and tell us which ones did you enjoy the most in our comments section below. For the latest food news, health tipsand recipes, like us on Facebookor follow us on Twitterand YouTube. 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List of Asian cuisines

List of Asian cuisines


Location of Asia.This is a list of Asian cuisines, by region. A cuisine is a characteristic style of cookingpractices and traditions,[1]usually associated with a specific cultureor region. Asia, being the largest and most populous continent, has many great cuisines. Contents1 Central Asian cuisine2 East Asian cuisine3 Southeast Asian cuisine4 South Asian cuisine5 West Asian cuisine6 See also7 References8 External linksCentral Asian cuisine[edit]Location of Central Asia. In some definitions, it also includes Afghanistan(south of area shown).Central Asian cuisine includes food from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistanand Uzbekistan.Bukharan cuisine- cuisine of Bukhara Jewswith great influence Uzbeks cuisineKazakh cuisine– cuisine of Kazakhstan. Traditional Kazakh cuisine revolves around muttonand horse meat, as well as various milk products. For hundreds of years, Kazakhs were herders who raised fat-tailed sheep, Bactrian camels, and horses, relying on these animals for transportation, clothing, and food.[2]Kazakh wineKyrgyz cuisine– originating in Kyrgyzstan, is similar in many respects to that of its neighbors, particularly Kazakh cuisine. Traditional Kyrgyz food includes mutton and horse meat, as well as milk products. The cooking techniques and major ingredients have been strongly influenced by the nation's nomadic way of life.Karakalpaks cuisine(ru:Каракалпакская кухня) - similar to Kazakhs and Kyrgyz cuisines with great influence Uzbeks cuisineTajik cuisine– traditional cuisine of Tajikistan, has much in common with Afghan, Russian, and Uzbek cuisines. Plov, also called osh, is the national dish in Tajikistan, as in other countries in the region. It consists of chunks of mutton, carrotsand rice fried in a large cast-iron cauldron similar to a Dutch oven. Green teais the national drink. Traditional Tajik meals start with a spread of dried fruit, nuts, halva, and other sweets arrayed on the table in small dishes, and then progress to soup and meat, before finishing with plov.Turkmen cuisine– cuisine of Turkmenistan. It is similar to that of the rest of Central Asia. Plov is the staple, everyday food, which is also served at celebrations. Turkmenistan is perhaps most famous for its melons, especially in the former Soviet Union, where it was once the major supplier. Meals are almost always served with naan, Central Asian flat bread, known locally as "çörek."Uzbek cuisine– cuisine influenced by local agriculture, as in most nations. There is a great deal of grain farming in Uzbekistan, so breads and noodles are of importance, and Uzbek cuisine has been characterized as "noodle-rich".[3]Mutton is a popular variety of meat due to the abundance of sheep in the country and it is a part of various Uzbek dishes. Uzbekistan's signature dish is palov(osh) made with rice, pieces of meat, grated carrots and onions.Central Asian cuisineHorse meatplatter. Kazakh cuisinerevolves around mutton, horse meat and various milk products.


The 20 Best Countries in the World for Food

Your mom cooks the best food ever in the universe. We know that. But if one day you want to try food which (would never be better of course) would be different from your mother’s, then this article is for you. When you are out of country, you need some hints not to get lost in the variety of tastes and flavors. We will give you a list of stories not only about best destinations for food, but also about how to understand what is on your plate. What are the must-eats and must-drinks? And what you should avoid not to get into awkward situations… Which are the Best Countries in the World for Food? Let’s start! Don’t get overexcited though, this list is not a rating- it’s just a collection of delicious destinations!


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