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Release time:2018-12-13
Jax Navy Flying Club

Jax Navy Flying Club


Club Manager – Moe Vazquez New Office Numbers : 904-542-8509 Fax: 904-542-8520 Moe’s Cell: (904)-699-0826   Maurice.vazquez@navy.mil   Flying Instructors Cell Phones: Chris Ambler – 904-945-1241   Ron Koblitz – 904-264-7786    Bill Derr – 904-505-7810              Bob Brinley – 904-466-7030 Membership:  DOD Active/Retired Personnel, Federal Employees, Civil Air Patrol members Aircraft/Instructor Scheduling Link:  http://jnfc.skymanager.com For additional information e-mail Jaxnfc@gmail.com  


nasair launches its first flights from Dammam to Yanbu and Khartoum, Launched a New Sales Office in Jubail to serve nasair Customers in the region

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771 Naval Air Squadron

771 Naval Air Squadron


771 Naval Air SquadronFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to navigationJump to search771 Naval Air SquadronActive1939–1955 1961–1964 1967–2016Country United KingdomBranchFleet Air Armof the Royal NavyRoleSearch and Rescue TrainingGarrison/HQRNAS CuldroseMotto(s)"Non Nobis Solum" (Latin: "Not unto us alone")EquipmentSea King HAR.5771 Naval Air Squadron of the Fleet Air Armwas formed on 24 May 1939 at Lee-on-Solentas a Fleet Requirements Unit with 14 Fairey SwordfishTSR biplanes. The Squadron carried out various exercises with ships and provided towed targets for naval air gunners and was decommissioned on 22 March 2016. Contents1 Second World War2 Post Second World War3 Helicopter-only squadron4 Ace of Clubs5 Rescues6 RN SAR 607 Aircraft Operated by 771 NAS8 Commanding officers9 References10 External linksSecond World War[edit]The Squadron initially had a northern element (X Flight), and a southern element (Y Flight). 'X' Flight broke away on 28 September 1939 to become 772 Naval Air Squadron. The reshaped 771 NAS was based at RNAS Hatstonflying a variety of fixed-wing aircraft, ranging from Supermarine Walrusesto Hawker Hurricanes, from airfields across the UK and abroad. A notable point in 771s wartime history was that they started the chain that led to the sinking of the German battleship Bismarck. The Commanding Officer of HMS Sparrowhawk, Capt Henry Lockhart St John Fancourt, RN, had been ordered to identify and sink the Bismarck at the earliest opportunity. The two squadrons of Albacore TSRshe had did not have sufficient range to attack the battleship whilst in harbour. He was relying on the Royal Air Forceto carry out flights over Bergen, and inform the Royal Navywhen the Battleship had left port. On 22 May 1941 RAF Coastal Commanddeemed the weather unsuitable for flight; however, Capt Fancourt, RN volunteered to put together a crew to fly 771s Martin Marylandtwin engined plane to carry out the sortie. Temporary Lieutenant (A) Noel Ernest Goddard, RNVR, at the time the Senior Pilot of 771 NAS, volunteered to pilot the sortie, with his crew of Acting Leading Airman John Walker Armstrongas TAG-WO, and Leading Airman J. D. Milneas TAG-AG. The extremely experienced observer Commander Geoffry Alexander Rotherham, at the time the Air Stations XO, stepped up to act as Mission Commander. Goddard flew on instruments at low level over the sea, making landfall on target. Having identified that the ships had sailed already they attempted to radio their discovery back to RAF Coastal Command. However, they did not receive any reply. Rotherham decided to contact the Air Station directly on the Towed Target frequency and also fly directly to HMS Sparrowhawk's forward airfield, Sumburgh, where the Albacores were ready to intercept.Acting on Rotherhams's radio message, the Home Fleetwere set to sea and engage the Bismarck and her escorts intercepting her at the Battle of the Denmark Straits. On 16 September 1941 The London Gazettereported the awarding of the following honours: Rotherham received the DSO,[1]Goddard the DSC,[2]and Armstrong the DSM.[2]Goddard went on to Command 771 NAS as a Temporary Lieutenant Commander (A) on 15 October 1941.On 1 July 1942 771 NAS moved to RNAS Twattto fly more modern aircraft in a similar role. Post Second World War[edit]In February 1945, 771 received the Sikorsky Hoverfly, making it the first naval air squadron to operate helicopters, which it used until May 1947. After victory in Europethe Fleet moved from Scapa Flowto Portsmouthand the anchorage at Portland. 771 NAS followed south to RNAS Zealsand then to RNAS Lee-on-Solentand RNAS Ford. Here the Squadron flew Miles Martinets, Douglas Bostons, Vought Corsairs, Grumman Wildcats, Airspeed Oxfords, Grumman Hellcats, Supermarine Seafires, North American Harvards, de Havilland Mosquitoes, Hawker Sea Furys, Short Sturgeons, as well as the Hoverfly. The Hoverflies were transferred to 705 Naval Air Squadronas it was formed. During the Defence reductions following the Second World War it was decided that 771 would be disbanded in August 1955 (whilst operating the Avro Anson, de Havilland Sea Hornet, Gloster Meteor, de Havilland Sea Vampireand Fairey Firefly) when it combined with 703 Naval Air Squadronto form 700 Naval Air Squadron. Helicopter-only squadron[edit]771 NAS reformed in 1961 and assumed the helicopter trials and training roles from 700 NAS with the Westland Whirlwind, Westland Dragonfly, and the Westland Waspprototype at RNAS Portland. During this time 771 was able to pioneer and develop many Search And Rescue techniques; including helicopter in-flight refueling (HIFR), hi-line transfer, free diver drop and cliff winching techniques. Soon after standing up again, the Squadron gained two Westland Whirlwind HAR.3s and assumed the RNAS Portland SAR commitment. The Squadron was disbanded on 1 December 1964, on being absorbed into 829 Naval Air Squadron. 771 Squadron Westland WhirlwindHAS.7 SAR rescue helicopter at Portland in 1967.On 23 June 1967, the squadron reformed with the new primary task of anti-submarine warfare (ASW)Fleet Requirements Unit, in addition to the Portland SAR duty. Nine Whirlwind HAS.7 were used by the Squadron at this time. The Westland Wessexwas introduced in 1969 with the Mk 1. This marked the beginning of a long association of the aircraft with the squadron. By 1970, the ASW role had been passed on to 737 Naval Air Squadron, making SAR 771's primary role, a role that has remained to the present day. The Squadron moved to RNAS Culdrosein September 1974. Six of its Wessex aircraft were left at RNAS Portland, to form the basis of 772 Naval Air Squadron. The Wessex HAS.1 was replaced by the twin turbine-powered Wessex HU.5 in 1979, when it was involved with the 1979 Fastnet racerescues. During the Falklands Conflictall of 771 aircraft were taken for troop transport roles, some went to 722 Naval Air Squadron, but the majority reformed 847 Naval Air Squadronand 848 Naval Air Squadronalong with some of 771 NASs aircrew. The remaining crew went either to their old aircraft type, or to new roles in the Lynxor Waspfleets. Two Wessex Mk.5 from Wroughton were used in August 1982 to form the backbone of 771 NAS as it took the SAR commitment back from the RAF. In January 1983 the Squadron once again operated mixed fleets of rotary and fixed wing aircraft as it absorbed the Station Flight, taking ownership of two Chipmunksand 2 Sea Devons. It operated these until the end of 1989 when the Sea Devon was withdrawn from service. In 1985 the Squadron absorbed 707 Naval Air Squadron's Wessex helicopters when 771 NAS took over CommandoHelicopter Training. The Wessex were replaced by Westland Sea KingHAS.5s, converted to HAR.5s, in October 1987 as the Squadron assumed a long range, day/night and all weather SAR capability. In July 2001, 771 Squadron assumed the responsibility for Advanced and Operational Flying Training for anti-submarine warfare (ASW) pilots and Observers, as well as the residual Sea King HAS.5 & HAS.6 Pilot Conversion and Refresher Courses. In its final years the Squadron operated the Sea King HAR.5 in the grey and red colours, with nine permanently stationed at RNAS Culdrose. 771's sister unit, Gannet Flightoperates 3 HAR.5s performing a similar role from HMS Gannet on Prestwick Airport. 771's primary role was one of military Search and Rescue, with secondary roles in civilian Search and Rescue, Pilot and Observer refresher training, utility and liaison and ab-initio Pilot Conversion and operational training. To perform these roles, one of the helicopters was on 15 minutes notice to fly during the day, and 45 minutes during the night, with a duty crew on call for 24 hours. This duty was maintained for 365 days of the year, with a second standby aircraft ready to assist should the emergency have demanded it. It stopped rescue duties on 1 January 2016 and was decommissioned on 22 March 2016. The squadron was responsible for saving over 15,000 lives on more than 9,000 missions.[3][4] Ace of Clubs[edit]771s Helicopters feature the unofficial Ace of Clubs Squadron Logo. The origin of this logo is unclear, but it is widely believed to follow a similar pedigree as the Royal Navy Historic FlightHawker Sea Hawk, wearing 806 NAS's Ace of Diamonds logo. Shortly after the Second World War Squadrons of the Fleet Air Arm often had an in-house display team. Each of the display aircraft were painted with identification marks. Playing card suits were chosen by some Squadrons as they were a neat identification that allows clear hierarchy; the Squadron Commanding Officer would take the Ace card, the XO the King and so on until each aircraft had a value relating to the seniority in the Squadron/display team of that pilot. Today 771 does not assign an aircraft to each pilot, instead operating a pool of aircraft allowing each pilot to fly any helicopter. It was chosen that only the Ace of Clubs would be painted on each of the helicopters in the Squadrons fleet. Rescues[edit]771 NAS was one of the busiest SAR units in the UK being called out an average of 220 times per year. With the limitations in civilian flight rules for the Cornwall Air Ambulance pilots 771 was also often called upon to perform patient and hospital transfers throughout the West Country. These were typically when the Air Ambulance was engaged in other duties, in poor weather, at night or where no suitable landing place was close by, allowing the Sea Kingto utilise its winch.Individual honours have included 4 George Medals, 3 Air Force Crosses, 6 Queens Gallantry Medals, and 14 Queen's Commendation for Braveryawards. Some of the more memorable rescues have been: 1978 – Ben Asdale, Air Force Cross awarded to Lt AJM HoggRN, and Lt Cdr MJ Norman RN[5]1979 – Fastnet Race[6]1985 – Fastnet Race, George Medal awarded to the Rescue Diver; POACMN L Slater[7]for his rescue of Simon Le Bonand 19 other survivors from the Yacht Drum1985 – Yacht Master Cube1989 – MV Secil Japan,[8]Air Force Medal awarded to the Rescue Diver CPOACMN JPR Grinney[9]1989 – MV Murree,[10]George Medal awarded to each of the 2 Rescue Divers; POACMN DS Wallace, POACMN SW Wright [11]1992 – Boyd Trophywon for night rescue of five crew from yacht Sine Seorra off Guernsey, Air Force Medal awarded to LA I Chambers[12]2004 – Boyd Trophywon for Boscastle Floodrescues,[13]Air Force Cross awarded to Lt Cdr MJ Ford RN[14]2005 – Boyd Trophywon for the recovery of critically ill crewman from fishing vessel 240 miles off coast in gale-force winds and very poor visibility2007 – MSC Napoli, PO J O'Donnel awarded Queen's Gallantry Medal2008 – Pesca del Verdes, CPOACMN D Rigg awarded Queen's Gallantry Medal[15]2009 – Fishing Vessel Trevessa, PO D Lacy awarded Queen's Gallantry Medal[16]2011 – Yacht Andriette, Sgt A Russell RM awarded George Medal for his role in the rescue[17]RN SAR 60[edit]As one of only two presently commissioned units of the ten that have operated in the dedicated Royal Navy Search and Rescue role, 771 NAS are a core part of the year-long celebration to recognise 60 years of RN Helicopter Search and Rescue. Events are taking place throughout the country and media all year, with the RN SAR Force raising £60,000 for charity. Aircraft Operated by 771 NAS[edit]There are 68 different marks of aircraft known to have been operated by 771 NAS. LysanderMartinet TT.1Royal Navy HurricaneHellcatSeafire F.15Mosquito Mk.16Sea Hornet FR.20Sea Fury T.20Sturgeon TT.2Firefly T.1Firefly AS.6DragonflyWestland Wasp HAS.1WhirlwindWessex HU.5 similar given to 847 NAS and 848 NAS for the Falklands ConflictAircraft EquipmentEntered ServiceLeft ServiceSwordfishMay 1939Apr 1945Henley IIIOct 1939Aug 1943Walrus INov 1939Feb 1940Skua IIApr 1940Apr 1943Roc IApr 1940May 1944


MAAM's  P2V

MAAM's  P2V


HISTORYThe Lockheed P2V "Neptune" is unique in that it is theonly American naval land-based patrol plane ever designed expressly for thispurpose.  Both the "Neptune's" predecessor, the PV2 "Harpoon", andsuccessor, the P3 "Orion", were first built by Lockheed as transports... thePV2 as the "Lodestar", and the P3 as the "Electra".  The P2V was also thelast US military aircraft to feature the Emerson ball turret, which wasinstalled for a time in the aircraft nose, and was the last radial enginepowered bomber accepted for delivery by the US.  From May 12, 1945 to theend of its production run in 1962, 1,036 "Neptune's" were produced in sevenmajor variants, with the US Navy receiving the vast majority.  The"Neptune's" versatility is evident from the many missions this aircraft wascalled on to perform... it truly set the standard for modern patrol aircraft.In early 1941, Lockheed Aircraft's Vega division begandesign work on a twin-engined bomber.  It was felt that the aircraft,utilizing the then new Wright R-3350 Cyclone engine, would be able to carry alarger bomb load for longer distances than existing four-engined heavy bomberslike the B-17 "Flying Fortress" and B-24 "Liberator".  The resultingaircraft design, designated "model 26", was a large, mid-wing bomber,accommodating a crew of seven.  Because it was a relatively low wartimepriority, (at the time even longer range and heavier bomb loads were beingplanned for), the "model 26" project's R-3350 engines were diverted to anotherproject, the Boeing B-29 "Superfortress".  Development of the "model 26"prototype was renewed as the war progressed, however, with fifteen aircraftordered by the Navy in April of 1944.  The XP2V-1 "Neptune", as it wasdesignated, was finally flown for the first time toward the end of the war onMay 17, 1945, shortly after the German surrender. Assuming its patrol duties with the US Navy shortlyafter the Second World War, "Neptune's" saw their first combat use during theKorean Conflict.  There they were used in ground attack, mine laying, dayand night bombing and rocket attack and as armored combat transports as well. They became the "Cold War" patrol aircraft along both American coasts, wereactive in the Cuban missile crisis, and participated in the American spaceprogram as well.  During the Viet Nam war P2's were involved withelectronic warfare and, as night and all-weather interdiction aircraft. The OP-2E version flown byVO-67dropped sensors along the Ho Chi Minh trail and other supply routesto detect enemy troop and vehicle movement, and even the Army flew them as anattack variant, the AP2E.Themost famous "Neptune" was, without a doubt, a P2V-1, the "Truculent Turtle",which, from September 29th through October 1st, 1947, flew non-stop, withoutrefueling, from Perth, Australia, to Columbus, Ohio, a world-record settingdistance of 11,235 miles.  This piston engine powered record stood almostforty years, until Burt Rutan's "Voyager" circled the globe non-stop inDecember of 1986.  A more typical "Neptune" mission lasted ten hours,with a crew of ten.  Because of the long mission capabilities, the P2'swere equipped with a small galley and an electric stove.  The only bunk,however, was soon removed to make way for additional electronics gear, withthe floor or wing being the only place to stretch out. The P2V-7 model, the type acquired and now operated bythe Mid-Atlantic Air Museum, was first flown in 1954.  Re-designatedSP-2H, OP-2E, and AP-2H after 1962, "Neptune"s continued to serve through theViet Nam war and until the mid 1970's.  By that time, however, the P3"Orion" had replaced the P2 in all service but with reserve units.  Mostfound their way to Davis Monthan Air Force Base, in Arizona, where they wereplaced in storage.


Flamingo Air

Trip:RoundtripOnewayFlying From:Bimini, Bahamas – BIMGrand Bahama Intl Airport – FPOBlack Point Airport – BPOStaniel Cay, Bahamas – TYMNassau, Bahamas – NASMarsh Harbour Cay, Bahamas – MHHMangrove Cay, Bahamas – MAYFarmers Cay=”FCE”<Farmers Cay, Bahamas – FCE Flying to:FPO – Grand Bahama Intl AirportNAS – Nassau, BahamasMHH – Marsh Harbour, BahamasGHB – Governors Harbour Airport, BahamasELH – North Eleuthera, BahamasBIM – Bimini, BahamasTYM – Staniel Cay, BahamasNAS – Nassau, BahamasNAS – Nassau, BahamasTYM – Staniel Cay, BahamasMAY – Mangrove Cay, BahamasFCE – Kinshasa, NDjili AirportBPO – Bulawayo AirportFPO – Grand Bahama Intl AirportNAS – Nassau, BahamasFPO – Grand Bahama Intl AirportFPO – Grand Bahama Intl AirportNAS – Nassau, Bahamas Depart Date:12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember20142015201620172018201920202021Return Date:12345678910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031JanuaryFebruaryMarchAprilMayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctoberNovemberDecember20142015201620172018201920202021Adult:0123456789Child 2-17 yrs:0123456789Infant > 2 yrs:0123456789Search By:FLEXIBLEFIXED

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