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cholesterol medication simvastatin

Release time:2019-05-07
Simvastatin

Simvastatin is in a group of drugs called HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, or "statins." It reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of "good" cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL).


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Statins Side Effects: Pain, Inflammation, and More

Statinsare a class of drugs often prescribed by doctors to help lower cholesterol levelsin the blood. By lowering the levels, they help prevent heart attacksand stroke. Studies show that, in certain people, statinsreduce the risk of heart attack, stroke, and even death from heart diseaseby about 25% to 35%. Studies also show that statins can reduce the chances of recurrent strokes or heart attacksby about 40%. Who Should Take Statin Drugs?Estimates are that in addition to the people already taking them, another 15 to 20 million people should be taking statin drugs based on their risk factors for heart disease. Your doctor can do a simple bloodtest to determine the amount of cholesterolin your blood. If you have high levels of LDL("bad”) cholesterol, you have a greater chance of heart disease, especially when there are other factors that increase your risk. Based on your overall risk, your doctor may recommend you take statins to help lower your cholesterolby a certain percentage. However, not all cholesterol is bad. It's good, for instance, to have high levels of HDL ("good") cholesterol. HDL cholesterolprevents plaque buildup in the arteriesby transporting the bad (LDL) cholesterol out of the blood to the liver. There, it is eliminated from the body. How Do Statin Drugs Work?Statin drugs work by blocking the action of the liverenzyme that is responsible for producing cholesterol. Too much cholesterol in the blood can cause a buildup of plaque on the walls of the arteries. That buildup can eventually cause the arteries to narrow or harden. Sudden blood clotsin these narrowed arteries can cause a heart attack or stroke. Statins lower LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels. At the same time, they lower triglyceridesand raise HDL cholesterol levels. Statins may also help to stabilize plaques in the arteries. That makes heart attacks less likely. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle while taking a statin can improve the effectiveness of the drug. Be sure to: Eat a balanced, heart-healthy dietGet regular physical activityLimit alcohol intakeAvoid smoking


Zocor (simvastatin): Statin Uses, Side Effects & Dosage

Zocor (simvastatin): Statin Uses, Side Effects & Dosage


Omudhome Ogbru, PharmDDr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in Pharmacy from the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy in 1995. He completed a Pharmacy Practice Residency at the University of Arizona/University Medical Center in 1996. He was a Professor of Pharmacy Practice and a Regional Clerkship Coordinator for the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy from 1996-99. Medical and Pharmacy Editor:


Zocor

Zocor (simvastatin) belongs to a group of drugs called HMG CoA reductase inhibitors, or "statins." Simvastatin reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of "good" cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL).


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Cholesterol Medications

Cholesterol Medications


For some people, lifestyle changes like a healthier diet and more exercise may prevent or treat unhealthy cholesterol levels. For others, medication may also be needed. Your doctor can assess your risk for a heart attack or stroke based on your cholesterol levels and other risk factors. From there, you can work with your doctor to develop a treatment and prevention plan that's right for you. If you have to take medication, you may feel disappointed. That’s OK – it’s normal. But don’t let your feelings stop you from taking your meds. Set up a routine, and stick to it. The minor inconvenience of medication vastly outweighs the devastation of a cardiovascular event. Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Various medications are used to lower blood cholesterol levels. Statins are recommended for most patients because they’re the only cholesterol-lowering drug class that’s been directly associated with reducing the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Your doctor may consider other medications too, especially if statins cause serious side effects or they don’t help you enough. Guidelines recommend that people in any of these four groups talk to their doctor about the risks and benefits of statin therapy: Adults 40-75 years of age with LDL (bad) cholesterol of 70-189 mg/dL and a 7.5 percent or higher risk for having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years.People with a history of a cardiovascular event (heart attack, stroke, stable or unstable angina, peripheral artery disease, transient ischemic attack, or coronary or other arterial revascularization).People 21 and older who have a very high level of LDL (bad) cholesterol (190 mg/dL or higher).People with diabetes and a LDL (bad) cholesterol level of 70-189 mg/dL who are 40 to 75 years old.Some patients who do not fall into these categories may also benefit from statin therapy. View an animation to see how cholesterol drugs work. *Some of the major types of commonly prescribed cardiovascular medications are summarized in this section. We’ve included generic names as well as major trade names to help you identify what you may be taking. Please understand that the American Heart Association is not recommending or endorsing any specific products. If your prescription medication isn't on this list, your healthcare provider and pharmacist are your best sources of information. It's important to discuss all the drugs you take with your doctor and understand their desired effects and possible side effects. Never stop taking a medication or change your dose or frequency without first consulting your doctor. *Some cholesterol-lowering medications may interact with grapefruit, grapefruit juice, pomegranate and pomegranate juice. Please talk to your health care provider about any potential risks.

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